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Study Guide

JOUR 200- Final Exam Guide - Comprehensive Notes for the exam ( 65 pages long!)


Department
Journalism
Course Code
JOUR 200
Professor
Ira Chinoy
Study Guide
Final

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UMD
JOUR 200
Final EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

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Kovach and Rosenstiel Reading
transaction/communication of news, not a lecture
Journalists have lost their values → our generation needs to work to get these values
back
news=connection to outside world, extension of rights
People want to know what is going on, may not want to pay for it
Sense of media bias can come from readers not reading the type of section (know
difference between editorial page, opinion, news) → pitching to audience
False equivalence
Ex: vaccine debate: some say vaccines lead to autism, news will simplify the
argument
Does ownership matter? What implications does it have for who owns the Washington
Post?
Issue of fake news → if see fake news somewhere, then again somewhere else you are
more likely to believe it
Journalists have to approach everything knowing that people believe many things and
that journalism needs to reflect that
Snapchat news→ go to where people are then draw them to other websites
Merriam Webster definition of news
“New information or a report about something that has happened recently”
“Information that is reported in a newspaper, magazine, television news program, etc.”
“Someone or something that is exciting and in the news”
How do you define news?
Something that has impact
Challenge of the journalist is to make people care
Characteristics of News (also called news values)
Timeliness
Proximity
Prominence
How well known is this person
Consequence
Rarity
Human interest
Debate on whether journalists should be doing human interest, but it shows the
more feel good, happier stories that make it seem that not everything is bad
Why does the quality of journalism matter?
What role are you playing in society?
Paparazzi vs.
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Prompts for Session 3
Prompts:
Skim the "Seven Secrets..." selection so that we can think about what it means to develop a sense
of themes or patterns or concepts that we might see at work - that we might develop - in our own
exploration of the history and landscape of American journalism. We will talk about these "Seven
Secrets" as one approach, but you will not be asked to memorize them.
In reflecting on all the readings, can we start to identify threads of continuity and change running
through the history of American journalism into the present and perhaps even into the future.
For, example, what sort of principles do you see laid out in the first five paragraphs of
Publick Occurrences? Why do you think Benjamin Harris wrote them -- and made them the first
article in his new newspaper? Are any of those principles still relevant? How and why? Can you
detect any other principles at work in the selection of news for this first edition of what Harris
hoped would be a newspaper printed regularly (rather than one that was shut down by the
authorities after its first printing)?
What themes might we see evidenced in the outcome of Zenger's conflict with authority and in
Benjamin Franklin's career as a printer, writer and public figure?
Fight against government and the right to print and write what one wanted
Hanson
Chp. 6, Newspapers and the News, “Colonial Publishing” (p. 128)
Publick Occurrences → first newspaper in American colonies
Government shut it down because of the harsh words against French monarchy
Needed a license to publish
Benjamin and James Franklin had large control over many of the newer media outlets in the
colonies
New England Courant was the first newspaper to be published with approval from British crown
Benjamin took over when James was arrested and bought the Pennsylvania Gazette
Weather report as regular feature
Chp. 1, Living in a Media World, “The New Seven Secrets About the Media…” (pp. 17-24)
The media are essential components of our lives
Helps transmit shared meaning
there are no mainstream media (MSM)
Old vs. new media
Number of subscribers/viewers
everything from the margin moves to the center
Pushing an agenda → argument that it is how the world is
The “crazy” becomes the norm
Repeated use of the terms/ideas
nothing’s new: everything that happened in the past will happen again
As a result of new technology and new people entering the field
all media are social
Interacting on social level
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