Study Guides

32 Pages
123 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 353
Professor
Blanchard
Semester
Fall

Description
Exam 1 (Chapters 1­4) 09/23/2013 CHAPTER 1 Psychopathology: Study of the nature, development, and treatment of psychological disorders Challenges to the study of psychopathology: Maintain objectivity (by following criteria – DSM) Avoid preconceived notions Reduce stigma Stigma: label given ▯ undesirable ▯ seen as different ▯ discriminated against  Mental Disorder: Personal Distress Emotional pain and suffering Disability Impairment in a key area (e.g., work, relationships) Violation of Social Norms Makes others uncomfortable or causes problems Dysfunction ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ Freudian Theory:  Human behavior determined by unconscious forces Psychopathology results from conflicts among these unconscious forces Id: unconscious, pleasure principle (immediate gratification), libido (energy of id) Ego: mostly conscious, reality principle (attempt to satisfy ID’s demands within reality’s constraints) Superego: conscience Psychoanalytic therapy: understanding early­childhood experiences and current relationships Behaviorism: focus on observable behavior and learning (rather than thinking or innate tendencies) Classical conditioning: Pavlov Implications: Substance use (environmental cue becomes conditioned stimulus, which then triggers the conditioned  response: craving) Anxiety (unconditioned can be paired with environmental stimuli or internal states which can then act as  conditioned stimuli) Operant conditioning: learning through consequences  Law of Effect: behavior that is followed by satisfying consequences will be repeated; behavior that is  followed by unpleasant consequences will be discouraged Principle of reinforcement: (Skinner)  Positive reinforcement Behaviors followed by pleasant stimuli are strengthened Negative reinforcement Behaviors that terminate a negative stimulus are strengthened ABCs of OC: antecedents, behavior, consequences  Modeling: learning by watching and imitating others’ behaviors Bandura: modeling reduced children’s fear of dogs Systematic desensitization: gradual exposure to feared object to treat phobias and anxiety Intermittent reinforcement: rewarding a behavior only occasionally is more effective than  continuous schedules of reinforcement  CHAPTER 2 Paradigm: perspective or conceptual framework from within which a scientist operates (goal: objectively  study abnormal behavior scientifically) Genetic paradigm: behavior impacted by heredity, nature impacted by nurture Gene expression: proteins influence whether the action of a specific gene will occur  Polygenic transmission: multiple genes influence a trait or phenotype. Heritability: extent to which variability in behavior is due to genetic factors Pleiotropic genes: genes that affect multiple, apparently unrelated, phenotypes De novo mutations: a genetic mutation that neither parent possessed nor transmitted Shared environment: events and experiences that family members have in common Nonshared environment: events and experiences that are unique to each family member Behavior Genetics: study of the degree to which genes and environmental factors influence behavior Genotype: genetic material inherited by an individual Phenotype: expressed genetic material, observable behavior and characteristics, depends on  interaction of genotype and environment Molecular Genetics: identifies particular genes and their functions Alleles: different forms of the same gene Polymorphism: difference in DNA sequence  on a gene occurring in a population SNPs (Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms): identify differences in sequence of genes CNVs (Copy Number Variations): identify differences in structure of genes; can be additions or  deletions in DNA within genes Knockout studies: removing specific genes in animals to observe effect on behavior Gene­environment interaction: one’s response to a specific environmental event is influenced by  genes Epigenetics: study of how the environment can alter gene expression or function Cross­fostering adoptee method: environment (mothering) was responsible for turning on (or  turning up) the expression of a particular gene Reciprocal Gene­Environment Interaction: genes predispose individuals to seek out situations  that increase the likelihood of developing a disorder Turkheimer  First Law : All human behavioral traits are heritable Second Law : The effect of being raised in the same family is smaller than the effect of genes Third Law : A substantial portion of the variation in complex human behavioral traits is not accounted for  by the effects of genes or families Neuroscience paradigm: examines the contribution of brain structure and function to  psychopathology Serotonin and Dopamine: Implicated in depression, mania,  and schizophrenia Norepinephrine: Implicated in anxiety and other stress­related disorders Gamma­Aminobutyric Acid (GABA): Inhibits nerve impulses, implicated in anxiety Agonist drugs: stimulate neurotransmitter receptor sites Antagonist drugs: dampen neurotransmitter receptor sites Frontal: reasoning, problem solving, emotion regulation Parietal: sensory­spatial Occipital: vision Temporal: sounds Limbic System: Often implicated in psychopathology, involved in the expression of emotions Amygdala: key brain structure for psychopathology researchers due to role in attending to emotionally  salient stimuli and in emotionally relevant memories Psychoactive drugs: alter neurotransmitter activity, view that behavior can best be understand by  reducing it to its basic biological components  Cognitive Behavioral: Roots in learning principles and cognitive science Behavior is reinforced by consequences Cognitive Science: Behaviorism criticized for ignoring thoughts and emotions Cognition: A mental process that includes: perceiving, recognizing, conceiving, judging, and reasoning Schema: Organized network of previously accumulated knowledge Implicit memory: the unconscious may reflect efficient information processing rather than being a  repository for troubling material Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT): Attends to thoughts, perceptions, judgments, self­ statements, and unconscious assumptions Cognitive Restructuring: Change a pattern of thinking; changes in thinking can change feelings,  behaviors, and symptoms Information­Processing Bias: Attention, interpretation, and recall of negative and positive  information biased in depression Object relations theory: Longstanding patterns of relating to others Attachment theory: Type and style of infant’s attachment to caregivers can influence later  psychological functioning Relational self: Individuals will describe themselves differently depending upon which close  relationships are told to think about  Interpersonal Therapy (IPT): Impact of current relationships on psychopathology  Diathesis­Stress paradigm: Integrative model that incorporates multiple causal factors Diathesis: Underlying predisposition May be biological or psychological Increases one’s risk of developing disorder Stress: Environmental events  May occur at any point after conception Triggering event CHAPTER 3 Diagnosis: the classification of disorders by symptoms and signs.  Advantages of diagnosis: Facilitates communication among professionals Advances the search for causes and treatments Cornerstone of clinical care Reliability: consistency of measurement Inter­rater: observer agreement  Test­retest: similarity of scores across repeated test administrations or observations Alternate Forms: similarity of scores on tests that are similar but not identical Internal Consistency: extent to which test items are related to one another Validity: how well does a test measure what it is supposed to measure? Content validity: extent to which a measure adequately samples the domain of interest, e.g., all of the  symptoms of a disorder Criterion validity: extent to which a measure is associated with another measure (the criterion) Concurrent: two measures administered at the same point in time Predictive: ability of the measure to predict another variable measured at some future point in time Construct validity: how well the test measures an abstract concept or inferred attribute Involves correlating multiple indirect measures of the attribute Important for validating our theoretical understanding of psychopathology Method for evaluating diagnostic categories st 1  DSM published in: 1952 DSM 5 Changes: disorders added, names changed to match research, some subtypes removed,  criteria made to apply better across cultures Categorical system of diagnosis: presence/absence of a disorder Dimensional system of diagnosis: rank on a continuous quantitative dimension; degree to which  a symptom is present Criticisms of DSM 5: too many diagnoses, everyday reliability  Comorbidity: presence of second diagnosis Interrater Reliability: extent to which clinicians agree on the diagnosis Clinical Interviews Informal/less structured interviews Interviewer attends thow  questions are answered Structured interviews All interviewers ask the same questions in a predetermined order Stress: subjective experience of distress in response to perceived environmental problems Projective test: type of personality test that records responses to ambiguous stimuli reflect  unconscious processes Concerns: reliability, validity Standardization: norming to allow comparisons with representative samples and determine deviation  from typical functioning in appropriate comparison group Self­monitoring: individuals observe and record their own behavior Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA): collection of data in real time using diaries or  smart phones . Reactivity: the act of observing one’s behavior may alter it CHAPTER 4 Usefulness of case studies:  1. Rich description, especially helpful for rare disorders 2. Disprove hypothesis 3. Generate hypotheses Limitations of case studies: 4. Paradigm may influence observations 5. Cannot rule out alternative explanations 6. Cannot prove hypothesis Confounds: third variable may produce changes in two correlated variables Epidemiology: study of the distribution of disorders in a population and possible correlates Three features of a disorder: Prevalence, incidence, risk factors Cross­fostering: study of adoptees who have  adoptive  parents with psychopathology Association studies: examine the relationship between a specific allele and a trait or behavior in the  population Genome­wide association studies (GWAS): examines the entire genome of a large group of  people to identify variations between people External validity: extent to which results generalize beyond the study Analogue experiment: induce temporary symptoms in a lab to examine related or similar behavior Exam 2 (Chapters 5­7) 09/23/2013 CHAPTER 5 Major depressive disorder:  Sad mood OR loss of interest/pleasure (almost every day, most of the day, for 2 weeks) AND 4 of the following Sleeping too much or too little Psychomotor retardation or agitation Poor appetite and weight loss, or increased appetite and weight gain Loss of energy Feelings of worthlessness or excessive guilt Difficulty concentrating, thinking, or making decisions Recurrent thoughts of death or suicide Episodic MDD: Symptoms tend to dissipate over time Recurrent MDD: Once depression occurs, future episodes likely (average number of episodes is 4) Subclinical depression: Sadness plus 3 other symptoms for 10 days (Significant impairments in  functioning) Persistent Depressive Disorder (Dysthymia): Chronic depressive disorder Depressed mood for most of the day more than half of the time for at least 2 years (1 year for  children/adolescents) PLUS 2 other symptoms: Poor appetite or overeating Sleeping too much or too little Low energy Exam 2 (Chapters 5­7) 09/23/2013 Trouble concentrating or making decisions Feelings of hopelessness Social factors of mood disorders: life events, lack of social support, interpersonal difficulties  (behavior of depressed people often leads to rejection by others) Behavioral perspective: depression reflects environmental and behavioral factors associated with  impoverished reward and excess punishment 2 dimensions of life stress:  independent (beyond one’s control) / dependent (result of individual’s actions) and  interpersonal (difficulties with close people) / noninterpersonal (work, school, health) Learned helplessness: learn that something is uncontrollable Psychological factors of mood disorders:  Beck’s theory Negative triad:  negative view of self, world, future Negative schema : underlying tendency to see the world negatively Negative schema cause  cognitive biases:  tendency to process information in negative ways Hopelessness Theory Desirable outcomes will not occur Person has no ability to change situation Attributional Style Stable and Global attributions can cause hopelessness Rumination Theory  A specific way of thinking: tendency to repetitively dwell on sad thoughts  Most detrimental is to brood over causes of events Exam 2 (Chapters 5­7) 09/23/2013 Social baseline theory: human brain has evolved in a social context, access to social resources is baseline of brain, social proximity and interaction decrease neural costs of  responding to environmental demands ( load sharing  and risk distribution), being alone is more  effortful Perception of physical challenges are shaped by: Age, fatigue, weight of burden (availability  ofsocial support  alters perception of challenges) Stress causation theory: the characteristics of the depressed person are thought to play a causal  role in generating stress over time (those with a history of depression tend to experience higher levels of  interpersonal life stress) Erosive: passive process where episode erodes personal and psychological resources Self­Propagating: active behaviors performed by the person Chronicity: episode duration, relapse, strict recurrence (after symptom­free) Neurotransmitter levels in MDD: low norepinephrine, serotonin, and dopamine Neurotransmitter levels in Mania: high norepinephrine and dopamine, low serotonin Tricyclic antidepressants: block reuptake of norepinephrine and serotonin increasing their levels Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAO­Is): block deprivation of norepinephrine and serotonin  increasing their levels Reserpine: decrease levels of norepinephrine and serotonin, depression is a side effect  Probabilistic Reward Task: the ability to modulate behavior as a function of reward reinforcement  history (lowered reward responsiveness in MDD) CHAPTER 6 Anxiety: apprehension about a future threat (increases preparedness) Fear: response to an immediate threat (triggers fight or flight) Sympathetic NS: Mobilizing resources, fight or flight (pupil dilation, increase HR, increase BP,  increased sweat) Phobias: disruptive fear of a particular object or situation Specific Phobia: disproportionate fear of a particular object or situation Exam 2 (Chapters 5­7) 09/23/2013 DSM­5 Criteria for Specific Phobia: marked and disproportionate fear consistently triggered by  specific objects or situations, the object or situation is avoided or else endured with intense anxiety, and  symptoms persist for at least 6 months Social anxiety disorder: causes more life disruption than other phobias, onset often adolescence  DSM­5 Criteria for Social Anxiety Disorder: marked and disproportionate fear consistently  triggered by exposure to potential social scrutiny, exposure to the trigger leads to intense anxiety about  being evaluated negatively, trigger situations are avoided or else endured with intense anxiety, symptoms  persist for at least 6 months DSM Panic Attack: a discrete period of intense fear or discomfort, in which at least four (or more) of  the following symptoms developed abruptly and reached a peak within 10 minutes 1. Palpitations, pounding heart, or accelerated heart rate 2. Sweating 3. Trembling or shaking 4. Sensations of shortness of breath or smothering 5. Feeling of choking 6. Chest pain or discomfort 7.  Nausea or abdominal distress 8. Feeling dizzy, unsteady, lightheaded, or faint 9. Derealization (feelings of unreality) or depersonalization (being detached from oneself) 10. Fear of losing control or going crazy 11. Fear of dying 12. Paresthesias (numbness or tingling sensations) 13. Chills or hot flushes Panic disorder: frequent panic attacks unrelated to specific situations Panic attack: sudden, intense episode of apprehension, terror, feelings of impending doom (symptoms  reach peak intensity within 10 minutes) Uncued attacks: occur unexpectedly without warning, panic disorder diagnosis requires recurrent  uncued attacks, causes worry about future attacks  Cued attacks: triggered by specific situations, more likely a phobia Exam 2 (Chapters 5­7) 09/23/2013 DSM­5 Criteria for Panic Disorder: recurrent uncued panic attacks, at least 1 month of concern  about the possibility of more attacks, worry about the consequences of an attack, or behavioral changes  because of the attacks Agoraphobia: anxiety about inability to flee anxiety­provoking situations DSM­5 Criteria for Agoraphobia: disproportionate and marked fear or anxiety about at least 2  situations where it would be difficult to escape or receive help in the event of incapacitation or panic­like  symptoms, these situations consistently provoke fear or anxiety and are avoided, require the presence of a  companion, or are endured with intense fear or anxiety, symptoms last at least 6 months Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD): involves chronic, excessive, uncontrollable worry, lasts at  least 6 months, interferes with daily life, often begins in adolescence or earlier DSM­5 Criteria for GAD: excessive anxiety and worry at least 50 percent of days about at least two  life domains, the worry is sustained for at least 3 months, the anxiety and worry are associated with at least  three of the following: 1. restlessness or feeling keyed up or on edge 2. being easily fatigued 3. Difficulty concentrating or mind going blank 4. Irritability 5. muscle tension 6. sleep disturbance Comorbidity of anxiety disorders: 80% of those with anxiety disorder meet criteria for another  anxiety disorder, 75% of those with anxiety disorder meet criteria for another psychological disorder Risk factors: genetics (heritability, relative with phobia increases risk for all anxiety disorders) &  neurobiological (overactivity in fear circuit, imbalance in neurotransmitters) Cognitive risk factors: sustained negative beliefs about future, belief that one lacks control over  environment, attention to threat Interoceptive conditioning: classical conditioning of panic in response to internal bodily sensations Five processes that are involved in maladaptive responses: 1. Inflated estimates of threat cost and probability 2. Hypervigilance 3. Deficient safety learning 4. Behavioral and cognitive avoidance  5. Heightened reactivity to threat uncertainty Exam 2 (Chapters 5­7) 09/23/2013 Treatment of the Anxiety Disorders involve: exposure, systematic desensitization, cognitive  approaches Psychological Treatment of Phobias: exposure Psychological Treatment of social anxiety disorder: exposure, social skills training,  cognitive therapy Psychological Treatment of panic: exposure to somatic sensations associated with panic attack  in a safe setting, use of coping strategies to control symptoms Psychological Treatment of GAD: relaxation training, cognitive behavioral methods Anxiolytics: drugs that reduce anxiety (Benzodiazepenes, antidepressants, D­cycloserine) CHAPTER 7 Obsessive­Compulsive Disorder (OCD): develops either before age 10 or during late  adolescence/early adulthood, more common in women, often chronic, 30­50% heritable  Body Dysmorphic Disorder: repetitive thoughts and urges about personal appearance Hoarding Disorder: repetitive thoughts about possessions  Obsessions: recurrent, intrusive, persistent, unwanted thoughts, urges, or images that the person tries  to ignore, suppress, or neutralize Compulsions: repetitive behaviors or thoughts that a person feels compelled to perform to prevent  distress or a dreaded event or that a person feels driven to perform in response to an obsession  (compulsions that are pleasurable are not compulsions) DSM­5 Criteria for OCD: obsessions or compulsions are time consuming (e.g., require at least 1  hour per day), or cause clinically significant distress or impairment Operant reinforcement: compulsions negatively reinforced by the reduction of anxiety Yadasentience: subjective feeling of knowing that you have thought enough or cleaned enough  (individuals with OCD have a yadasentience deficit) Cognitive­behavioral factors of Hoarding Disorder: poor organizational abilities, unusual  beliefs about possessions, avoidance behaviors Treatment of OCD: medicine, exposure (to full anxiety when not performing the compulsion) plus  response prevention, cognitive therapy Learning Theory View of OCD: compulsions and avoidance behavior reduce obsessional distress Behavioral Therapy for OCD Includes: procedures that evoke obsessional anxiety (exposure),  procedures that eliminate the contingency between performing compulsions and anxiety reduction  (response prevention) Exam 2 (Chapters 5­7) 09/23/2013 Cognitive Therapy for OCD Includes: psychoeducation (intrusive unpleasant thoughts are  universal), cognitive restructuring (modify mistaken beliefs about intrusive thoughts) Cognitive­Behavioral Therapy for OCD Includes: exposure in vivo (prolonged confrontation with anxiety evoking stimuli), imaginal exposure (prolonged imaginal confrontation with feared disasters), response prevention (refraining from rituals), and  cognitive procedures Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD): exposure to a traumatic event that involves actual or  threatened death or injury ▯ extreme response ▯ intense fear or helplessness (symptoms present for more  than a month, tends to be chronic) Four categories of symptoms: intrusively re­experiencing the traumatic event, avoidance of  stimuli, other signs of mood and cognitive changes, increased arousal and reactivity Risk factors: prior trauma and life adversity and prior clinical states such as depression or catastrophic  thinking may increase risk Peritraumatic dissociation: altered sense of time, “blanking out”, feeling disconnected Psychological Treatment of PTSD: exposure to memories and reminders of the original trauma,  cognitive therapy, treatment of ASD may prevent PTSD Medications for PTSD: selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most typically  prescribed  CHAPTER 5 Episodic MDD: Symptoms tend to dissipate over time Recurrent MDD: Once depression occurs, future episodes likely (average number of episodes is 4) Social factors of mood disorders: life events, lack of social support, interpersonal difficulties  (behavior of depressed people often leads to rejection by others) Behavioral perspective: depression reflects environmental and behavioral factors associated with  impoverished reward and excess punishment 2 dimensions of life stress:  independent (beyond one’s control) / dependent (result of individual’s actions) and  interpersonal (difficulties with close people) / noninterpersonal (work, school, health) Exam 2 (Chapters 5­7) 09/23/2013 Learned helplessness: learn that something is uncontrollable Psychological factors of mood disorders:  Beck’s theory Negative triad:  negative view of self, world, future Negative schema : underlying tendency to see the world negatively Negative schema cause  cognitive biases:  tendency to process information in negative ways Hopelessness Theory Desirable outcomes will not occur Person has no ability to change situation Attributional Style Stable and Global attributions can cause hopelessness Rumination Theory  A specific way of thinking: tendency to repetitively dwell on sad thoughts  Most detrimental is to brood over causes of events Social baseline theory: human brain has evolved in a social context, access to social resources is baseline of brain, social proximity and interaction decrease neural costs of  responding to environmental demands ( load sharing  andrisk distribution ), being alone is more  effortful Perception of physical challenges are shaped by: Age, fatigue, weight of burden (availability  ofsocial support  alters perception of challenges) Stress causation theory: the characteristics of the depressed person are thought to play a causal  role in generating stress over time (those with a history of depression tend to experience higher levels of  interpersonal life stress) Erosive: passive process where episode erodes personal and psychological resources Self­Propagating: active behaviors performed by the person Chronicity: episode duration, relapse, strict recurrence (after symptom­free) Exam 2 (Chapters 5­7) 09/23/2013 Neurotransmitter levels in MDD: low norepinephrine, serotonin, and dopamine Neurotransmitter levels in Mania: high norepinephrine and dopamine, low serotonin Tricyclic antidepressants: block reuptake of norepinephrine and serotonin increasing their levels Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAO­Is): block deprivation of norepinephrine and serotonin  increasing their levels Reserpine: decrease levels of norepinephrine and serotonin, depression is a side effect  Probabilistic Reward Task: the ability to modulate behavior as a function of reward reinforcement  history (lowered reward responsiveness in MDD) CHAPTER 6 Anxiety: apprehension about a future threat (increases preparedness) Fear: response to an immediate threat (triggers fight or flight) Sympathetic NS: Mobilizing resources, fight or flight (pupil dilation, increase HR, increase BP,  increased sweat) Phobias: disruptive fear of a particular object or situation Specific Phobia: disproportionate fear of a particular object or situation Social anxiety disorder: causes more life disruption than other phobias, onset often adolescence  Panic disorder: frequent panic attacks unrelated to specific situations Panic attack: sudden, intense episode of apprehension, terror, feelings of impending doom (symptoms  reach peak intensity within 10 minutes) Uncued attacks: occur unexpectedly without warning, panic disorder diagnosis requires recurrent  uncued attacks, causes worry about future attacks  Cued attacks: triggered by specific situations, more likely a phobia Comorbidity of anxiety disorders: 80% of those with
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 353

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit