Study Guides (248,151)
United States (123,290)
Sociology (16)
SOCY 105 (5)
all (2)
Final

FINAL QUESTION POOL

7 Pages
75 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOCY 105
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Fall

Description
12/17/2012  3. In march 2001, the food and drug administration gave permission for clinical  trials to be conducted for the drug BiDil. BiDil was designed to be marketed  specifically for blacks with heart disease and was called “the first ethnic drug”.  A. Using both “Racial Formations” and “The difference between us”, explain what  it means to say race is a social construction and why developing a medicine  specifically for a racial group is controversial. ­Medicines specifically for a racial group is extremely controversial because race is not concrete but socially  constructed and therefore is nobiologically real. Instead, ace    socially real based on the current  Racial Formations of the era. ­According to Omi, definitions of race are not fixed but socially constructed and are therefore subject to  racial formation.  In “Racial Formations”, Omi claims that race is a social construction (meaning that the definitions of things  are not fixed but are developed by the social and historical processes of the era). And are therefore subject  to racial formation which is the (Process by which social, economic, and political forces determine the  content and importance of racial categories, and by which they are in turn shaped by racial meanings.)  highlighting the idea that labels and definitions of races are subject to change.  Historically, this is true because racial meanings have varied over time and place.  ­In “The difference Between Us”, an experiment  between students of different ethnicities proves that race is  not biological. In the experiment, students of both similar and varying races to the one of their one tested  the similarities between DNA. They had all assumed to find their DNA be the most similar to others of their  respected racial group but found that their DNA varied just as much between different racial categories as it  did with individuals of the same race.   ­This highlights the truth being that race is not biological, but instead defined by the individuals in the  community and is subject to change. If the medicine were to work for blacks with heart disease, it should  work for all people with heart disease.  4. You are talking to a white friend about class and mentioned that you learned  white privilege is the flip side of racism. Your friend replies, “There is no point in  talking about white privilege because it doesn’t exist and its jut a way for people  of color to blame white people for their problems.” A. Using both Gallagher (“Color Blind Privilege”) and the Tim Wise film  (“Pathology of Privilege”), reply to your friend’s statement.  Explain to your friend what white privilege is and how color­blindness masks  white privilege.  I would respond to my friend saying that:  White privilege does exist. And it is because of color blindness that whites do not see the truth of the  situation.  ­White privilege is a set of unearned advantages whites receive solely based on their race.  ­The reason because you fail to see the white privilege you have is due to the color blindness that has been  prevalent in our society since the 1960’s.  ­Color blindness ((An ideology that explains contemporary racial outcomes as the product of non­ racial  dynamics.) or in other words, the belief that race plays no factor in a person’s condition) makes it so that  both racism and white privilege still persists.  ­ In “Color­Blind Privilege”, Gallagher explains that people want to be colorblind in order to feel better about  themselves.  It highlights how whites with the color­blind perspective explain their position as one that has been worked  for and earned. Although most take note of the unfair advantages that whites had over blacks in the past,  they claim that in this modern day, both have the same amount of opportunities available. Because whites  believe that racism is dead, more prejudice results because of white’s own failure to acknowledge their  privilege in society.  because it gives whites the sense that their achievements are due to their to their hard work and efforts and  not their white­ness.  After the 1960’s after slavery, jim crow laws, and legal segregation was abolished, whites believed that that  racism was abolished and that everybody started on a “new clean slate” Because of color blindness, whites are able to blame a minorities’ inability to “keep up” to a lack of  motivation or intelligence rather than to the system of white privilege that has historically been put in place.  However, this clean slate idea is not valid because whites did not factor in the importance that history plays  when determining an individual’s own chance of attaining achievement.  The accumulated impact of generational racial privilege and disadvantage shapes life chances.   Cannot all start on a clean slate because of the generational privilege that has been given to whites while  minorities have been suppressed. Allowing a white born after 1960’s to still benefit from privilege. (having  parents that attended college, living in a nice neighborhood, etc. etc. all predispose white to achievement) Tim Wise states that color blindness persists and is what keeps individuals from recognizing the truth. It  “allows us to not have conversations about privilege.” Therefore, it is what is giving whites the false notion of  entitlement because they are not educated enough on the matter.  5. While watching a news program about a city that wants to implement a school  busing program in order to make their public schools more diverse, a  commentator says they disagree with this program because people pick where  they want to live so it’s up to them to work hard to live in a good neighborhood  with good schools.  A. Using both “The House We Live In” and Orfield and Lee “Why Segregation  Matters”, reply to this person’s statement.  Explain the connection between housing segregation and the school’s  segregation and why this segregation 
More Less

Related notes for SOCY 105

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit