nursing exam review

2 Pages
273 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Nursing (NURS)
Course
PHCY 4450
Professor
Linda Brown
Semester
Spring

Description
Science has two important yields: increased understanding of the world within and around us  (“knowledge for knowledge’s sake”) and solutions to specific problems. But even the most  profound scientific knowledge won’t solve world problems such as hunger, poverty and  environmental damage if we fail to respect, understand and engage cultural differences. The resistance to vaccine use is a prime example. The supposed link between autism and  common childhood vaccines was based on fraudulent research published in the British  journal The Lancet in 1998. After the fraud was uncovered the lead author was stripped of his  medical license and the article was retracted. Subsequent investigations by the Department of  Health in the U.K. and the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies in the U.S. as well as  adefinitive study published in the August 2013 issue of The Journal of Pediatrics have all  debunked the vaccine–autism link. Yet the percentage of parents who delay or forgo  immunization of their children has increased alarmingly in recent years and, partly as a result,  measles, mumps and whooping cough are making a comeback. Similarly, genetically modified organisms, global climate change and other scientific, medical  and public health developments sometimes fail to gain public acceptance for reasons that lie far  outside the realm of science. And that is not the fault of the public—that is our fault as scientists.  We have not been effective in explaining to the public the scientific method, the peer review  system or the self­correcting nature of scientific research. When we can’t make headway against misinformation campaigns based on bogus science or  political agendas, clearly something more than the robustness of our data is at play. To use that  classic line from the Paul Newman movie Cool Hand Luke, “What we’ve got here is failure to  communicate.”Scientists need not only to explain much more clearly and compellingly what we  are doing but also to establish on social, cultural and emotional levels why our work is important.  We need to respect cultural differences that lead to misunderstanding and even fear of science. Too often we also fail to respect opinions that differ from our own. Science is a process of  iteration—of back­and­forth—and yet sometimes we scientists are guilty of promulgating our  own biases. Our subseq
More Less

Related notes for PHCY 4450

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit