Get 2 days of unlimited access
Study Guides (350,000)
US (200,000)
UC-Irvine (3,000)
ANTHRO (100)
Study Guide

ANTHRO 136K Study Guide - Winter 2018, Comprehensive Midterm Notes - Feminism, Black People, Sexual Orientation


Department
Anthropology
Course Code
ANTHRO 136K
Professor
O'ROURKE, S.
Study Guide
Midterm

This preview shows pages 1-3. to view the full 66 pages of the document.
ANTHRO 136K
MIDTERM EXAM
STUDY GUIDE
Fall 2018

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

ANTHRO 139K - Lecture 1 - Basics of Cultural Anthropology
Cultural Anthropology
The comparative study of human cultural diversity among all peoples in all places
throughout history.
This involves critical, historical contextualization to understand how different cultures
encounter and interact with each other.
Emphasis is placed on case studies for comparative analyses.
Anthropology is Holistic
Cultural anthropologists attend to all details of a culture.
In American anthropology Franz Boas established the four field system to support the
holistic approach:
Cultural anthropology
Physical anthropology
Linguistics
Archaeology
Public, applied, and politically engaged anthropology are gaining in importance.
Culture
A system of meanings embedded in symbols about the experiences that are shared by a
group of people and passed on from one generation to another.
Characteristics of Culture
Integrated within a bounded, yet malleable, system.
Articulates human wants and needs.
Learned
Shared
Taken for granted
Arbitrary
Always changing
Always debated
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Always involves relations of power
Society
A distinct, relatively autonomous community whose members share social institutions.
Their social relations are embedded in, and expressed through culture.
They interact according to social categories that are shaped by culture:
Roles
Norms
Mores
Incommensurability
The difficulty for members of a culture to communicate with or understand another
culture
Cultural Relativism
The attempt to understand the beliefs, meanings, behaviors, etc., of other cultures in
the context of their culture, history, and environment.
The RELATIVISTIC FALLACY: Nothing about a culture is wrong
Ethnocentrism
The tendency to judge other cultures from the perspective that one’s own culture is
correct and superior.
The ETHNOCENTRIC FALLACY: Nothing about a culture is right.
Constructionism and Essentialism
ESSENTIALISM: Human behaviors are unchangeable and rest on bedrocks, origins, or
independent forces that result in individuals or groups of people being different from
others.
CONSTRUCTIONISM: Human behaviors emerge, are shaped, persist, and change
through continual interactions among the contexts of different social, cultural,
environmental, and historical settings
Ethnography
The ethnography is the anticipated result of anthropological research.
It can represent elements of a culture or cultures through text, sound recordings,
photographs, video, film, other digital formats, and any combination therein
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version