Midterm+Study+Guide+for+History+40C.+2013.doc

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Department
History
Course Code
HISTORY 40C
Professor
Emily Rosenberg

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Description
Midterm Study Guide for History 40C (Spring, ’13) EXAM IS MONDAY, MAY 6 • BRING A BLUE BOOK TO CLASS; WE WILL MIX UP BLUE BOOKS. PLEASE TRY TO COME TO CLASS A LITTLE EARLY SO YOU CAN BE READY TO WRITE BY 11:00. • NOTE THAT THE IDS AND QUESTIONS ON THIS STUDY GUIDE ARE ADAPTED FROM THE WEEKLY STUDY GUIDES. IF YOU HAVE KEPT UP WITH THIS CLASS, THE MIDTERM SHOULD NOT BE DIFFICULT! • ALSO NOTE THAT THE EXAM QUESTIONS WILL COME DIRECTLY FROM THIS GUIDE To remind you of the general areas we have addressed in this class so far: Overall themes of course: Organized chronologically around three broad themes, the class is developing one theme each day of each week as follows: • People (Monday classes) o Who are “Americans”?: Immigration, mobility, race/ethnicity, gender • Money (Wednesday classes) o How have Americans lived?: The changing modes of production and consumption; wealth and poverty • Power (Friday classes) o How have Americans governed?: The growth of federal government; rise of US power in world Study IDs and Essay Questions: Note: • You will have a choice of 2 out of 3 IDs (10 min total); choice of 1 out of 2 short answers (10 min total); and a choice of 1 out of 2 essays (30 min total). • Please carefully plan your time. In 50 minutes you only have time to write 2- 5 sentences per ID, and a paragraph or so for the short answer. Leave yourselves the full 30 min to develop a good essay with a thesis and an argument that is supported by specific information. IDs: identify briefly (1 sentence or so) and provide the significance of the term to this course) (2-3 good sentences or so). These IDs come from your text and from lectures. YOU should be creative in articulating the possible significance(s) this term has in relationship to this course. “Jim Crow” laws “scientific management” and Frederick Taylor Progressive Movement So-called “New Immigration” Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906 Lewis Hine Conservation Movement War of 1898 (sometimes called the Spanish-American War) Philippine War W.E.B. DuBois NAACP Ida Wells Barnett Committee on Public Information during World War I League of Nations Debate Post World War I “Red Scare” Immigrant Restriction Act of 1924 Ku Klux Klan Great Migration Harlem Renaissance American automobile Advertising and installment buying Jacob Lawrence Great Depression Bonus Army New Deal “bank holiday” FDIC (Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation) Dust Bowl WPA photographers Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Social Security Act National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) Huey Long Upton Sinclair “isolationists” Eleanor Roosevelt Fair Employment Practices Commission (FEPC) Office of War Information “Zoot suit riots” in LA Bracero program “Double V” campaign Internment of Japanese Americans United Nations Short Answer Question: Write a paragraph or two that clearly answers the following questions. 1. Assess how the wave of so-called “new immigration” from Europe and the restrictions on immigration from Asia shaped the US population in the early 20th century. Be specific. 2. Why did some Americans support acquiring an American empire in 1898 (especially in the Philippines), and why did some oppose the war for imperial control over the Philippines? 3. Explain how the immigrant restriction act of 1924 grew out of the post-World War I environment, and analyze its effect on the composition of the American population. 4. Why did the United States not join the League of Nations even though it had been the idea of President Woodrow Wilson? 5. The automobile became an important symbol of 1920s America. Analyze the role of the automobile in America’s economics, culture, and international position in the 1920s. 6. The “New Deal” represented a philosophy that envis
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