Study Guides (400,000)
US (230,000)
UC-Irvine (3,000)
SOCIOL (70)
Study Guide

SOCIOL 1- Final Exam Guide - Comprehensive Notes for the exam ( 101 pages long!)


Department
Sociology
Course Code
SOCIOL 1
Professor
Tomlinson, C.
Study Guide
Final

This preview shows pages 1-3. to view the full 101 pages of the document.
UC-Irvine
SOCIOL 1
FINAL EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Lecture 01 - (06/26)
What is Sociology?
Looking at broader things: groups of people
(Psychology is about the individual)
Def: “the systematic, skeptical, and critical study of the social”
Sociology aims for generalizability
Applying ideas to a broader population
But we can’t study populations (b/c they’re huge)
So we take diverse smaller samples
Social Construct
How people behave
What is the “correct” way of interacting with one another
Are people programmed to act this way? Or is it defined by society?
Sociology will say that the way people act is all due to society and culture
ex) gender might be different in different cultures
Categories
Master statuses: social-economic status, sex and gender, race and ethnicity, age, and
sexuality
These groups are what defines people and how they’re seen in society
Why are these master statuses important?
Sociology vs. Anthropology
Sociology is comparative, not looking at a case study (anthropology)
Comparing different age groups, races, etc
Benefits of Sociological Thinking
Look at assumptions critically
Understand opportunities and constraints
Master statuses can cause roadblocks or easy achievement
Avoid ethnocentrism
Thinking that one culture is better than another culture
You usually think your own culture is best because you grew up in that culture
and shun other cultures because they’re different
Problems with Sociological Thinking
Society is always changing
Sociologists are influenced by their own contexts
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Ethnography
ex) investigating heart attack problems only through men and generalizing it to
the entire population
Having the influence of certain contexts have positive and negative effects
Positive: you understand the group’s jargons (slang)
Negative: prejudice and bias
Information found through study becomes part of society
Info found can be put on public (news)
Can cause misconceptions because it might exaggerate things and make it a
bigger issue than it already is
Sociological Theories and Perspectives
Functionalism
Society is suppose to work together and be harmonious (equilibrium)
Macro Theory
Body Analogy
Organs have their own specific function in the body
Instead of organs, we have institutions (political and education)
Society has institutions that serve different things and work together
Durkheim
Studies suicide
Anomie: not following norms lead to suicide
Too much integration can also lead to suicide
Types of Solidarity
Mechanical
People are similar to one another
Through that similarity and familiarity, people build bonds
and build a society
Individuals working together → society
Organic
Independence: everyone serves a different purpose in
society
Parsons
Grand Theory: Attempt to bring social sciences together
Thought that hierarchies are necessary
There are certain jobs no one wants to do
Inequality creates different jobs
People at the lower end that don’t want their jobs want jobs like
CEO so they gain motivation
Gender socialization
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version