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[AN N EA 10W] - Final Exam Guide - Comprehensive Notes for the exam (68 pages long!)


Department
Ancient Near East
Course Code
AN N EA 10W
Professor
Alice Mandell
Study Guide
Final

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UCLA
AN N EA 10W
FINAL EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

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Riley Stanton
TA: Adam DiBattista
7 April 2016
Week 2 Discussion Response: Eliade vs. Tweed
In Eliade’s article “Sacred Space and Making the World Sacred” it takes on a more
binary approach when talking about space. In the article the term profane is used to describe the
mundane, everyday, or earthly type of experiences that happen within a particular space. Eliade
describes the profane as “homogeneous and neutral; no break qualitatively differentiates the
various parts of its mass” meaning that there is not a distinct human experience that separates the
space apart (Eliade 22). One example provided in the text to describe a profane space is the
buildings surrounding a church (25). In my life an example that I would consider to be a profane
space would be a classroom because of the homogeneity of the space as well as the fact that it
does not bear any religious association with it. For me my experiences within a classroom has
separated the space as profane as opposed to sacred. The opposite of a profane space is a sacred
one. A sacred one is unlike the profane or mundane in the sense that it has been set apart from
other spaces by human experience which therefore it can then be considered a strong and
significant space (20). Eliade defines sacred as a nonhomogeneous space that has a greater
meaning than simply the everyday which is set apart from other spaces (20). Sacred spaces carry
a religious significance, which then establishes it as a something more than the everyday. An
example of a sacred space would be a church since “it shares in a different space from the street
in which it stands” (25). To further illustrate the point I would consider the Western Wall in
Jerusalem to be a sacred space since humans have put religious meaning behind and have
differentiated it from everyday spaces. Axis Mundi is the “center of the world” according to
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Eliade and orients the world around it ( 22). Axis mundi is not the actual center of the world
necessarily, but rather an area that is central to people’s lives and especially religion. A central
place or central region of the world that could be considered an axis mundi is Babylon (25). The
final term from Eliade is hierophany which is where the sacred appears and is the manifestation
of the divinity (21). An example is when Jacob, in the book of Genesis,had a dream in which he
envisioned God and set a monument upon the place he received the message calling it Beth-el or
house of God (26). Another example could be the establishment of the Our Lady of Guadalupe
church.
Unlike Eliade, Tweed views space as being continuous. Differentiated is “imaginatively
figured and/or sensually encountered locales that are deemed more or less special, singular or set
apart” (Tweed 119). A differentiated space, for example, can be the shrine of Our Lady of
Guadalupe Chapel (118). A space that I view as being differentiated is the Notre Dame cathedral
in France because it has been set apart for not only religious people that practice the faith, but
also non-religious people understand the significance of it. Kinetic is used to emphasize the idea
that “space are processes, not things” so they change over time (120). This can be used to
especially describe differentiated spaces due to the continuum in which culture is on. Tweed uses
this idea of spaces being kinetic to then describe the founding of the Our Lady of Guadalupe
chapel since due to a religious event a space changed in importance moving along the continuum
and becoming more differentiated. I would use this term to describe the changing of religious
centers such as the Church of Sepulchre which has been used by many different religions.
Interrelatedness of a space connects with how space is also kinetic. A space is interrelated not
just because it is connected to other sites and events, but also the many cultural, political, social,
and economic “currents” which act upon a specific space (121). Tweed describes how a mosaic
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