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[CLASSIC 148] - Final Exam Guide - Comprehensive Notes fot the exam (30 pages long!)


Department
Classics
Course Code
CLASSIC 148
Professor
Blank David
Study Guide
Final

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UCLA
CLASSIC 148
FINAL EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

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Lecture 1 - The Milesians
- In antiquity, physicians would travel from place to place, would form
contracts with cities to stay there for a few years.
- May make a home in a city if there is a large enough population and
plenty of resources to support them.
- May do public demonstrations, explain structure of animals, thus
advertising themselves.
- May also perform debates or speeches showing off knowledge of
medicine to fight for a contract. In addition, may treat patients in
public or some non-private forum.
- Nowadays, privacy is very important. Can’t access medical records.
In antiquity, privacy wasn’t very important, patients often treated in
public, used as form of advertisement.
- In antiquity, people felt that knowledge of medicine was essential to
education. Laypeople would often watch physicians to get feel of
technological progress.
- Gnosis: Knowledge; learning.
- Different illnesses arise because of a different cause.
- Diagnosis: What you have; in antiquity, was basic because didn’t
know cause of most illnesses, prognosis was most important.
- Prognosis: Knowledge of what’s going to happen; what
prescriptions/antibiotics to take, how to take it, what will happen if you
take it properly.
- Better ways to find out about illness: Talk to someone who is more
exprienced in the field, read material that pertains to this illness.
- What forms basis for prognosis in antiquity: Interpretation of science.
- Philosophia: Love of knowledge. Covered all knowledge, science
included. Almost a synonym of today’s meaning of science.
- Socrates didn’t write much, much of teachings were oral. A lot of
people wrote about Socrates like dialogue, etc.
- Two people’s works on Socrates got passed down to us: Zenaphon
and Plato.
- There were followers of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle.
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- In the text, T means testimony. DK and KRS are examples of
authors, and numbers after these abbreviations represent the
numbering of the text of which the testimony was originally preserved.
Notations at end of testimony represent the works of which these are
found.
- Logos: Most commonly means discourse, or sentence, speech,
reason in reasoning.
- Discourse: How to interact and prevent yourself. Reason: Establish
you know your stuff, that you have a techne (art/craft/discipline.) In
antiquity, people thought techne was valuable because you could
charge money for teaching it.
- Also can use techne, can make products, build structures, etc.
- Can also be used as source of authority.
- Ancient Greece intellectual, thinking of things and answers to things.
- The world has to present to us data that in some way is organizable
according to principles of reasoning.
- Data may follow mathematical regularities. Repeated mathematical
data points make up the structured world.
- Cosmos (in ancient Greece): Something that’s beautiful, lends
attractiveness to something else. The world is a beautiful place, is
orderly.
- Universe was made up of rings. Earth was center, sun was at outer
ring, others stars were on inner rings.
- Outside of universe was fiery, sun had more fire, more bright, so
further away, stars were bright but not as bright, fire on earth gotten
by small lights such as candles.
- Systematic relationships are governed by certain principles. One
principle is that light comes from fiery sources. Another is that fiery
hot entities tend to rise up, seem to have natural place somewhere
above earth.
- Under fire is air, then water, then earth (the land).
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