Study Guides (390,000)
US (220,000)
UCLA (3,000)
MUSC (10)
Study Guide

MUSIC 15 Study Guide - Winter 2018, Comprehensive Midterm Notes - Frédéric Chopin, Chord Progression, Rhythm


Department
Music
Course Code
MUSIC 15
Professor
Jocelyn Ho
Study Guide
Midterm

This preview shows pages 1-3. to view the full 39 pages of the document.
MUSIC 15
MIDTERM EXAM
STUDY GUIDE
Fall 2018

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Nyckelharpa: Swedish instrument built with spruce and pear tree wood;
Composers: Write original music
Arranger: One who makes another’s original music sound different
Caprice: A lively piece of music, typically one that is short and free in form
Composer’s toolbox: Fundamental Music Shapes
Binary (divide into 2; 1, 2, 1, 2, 1, 2)
Hip hop, salsa, tango, reel, swing, polka, disco
Ternary (divide into 3: 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3,)
Waltzes, doo-wop, jig, mazurka, hambo, polska
All music can be divided into either binary or ternary rhythm
Fun fact, Mission Impossible theme is 5!
The Dipsea Caprices: From Said Trail in Marin County
Inspiration: Hike with two friends along trail; one borrowed my camera to take 22 photos,
leading to 22 caprices
Caprice #9: Schottis!
Mathematical symbolism: second half of dance contain odd number of beats
4+4+4+4+4+5 to represent the odd one out of a couple or group; (crooked
tunes)
Key of d minor (classical and stereotypical key of death) chosen to match the
dead log in photo
Caprice #10: Waltz
Moderately paced dance in ternary rhythm; basic step outlines are square on
over six beats A ubiquitous dance across Europe and America
Melody constructed from scale that walks up and down in near perfect symmetry,
with a new not happening every other bar. The exception is in the end of the
sequence which includes an extra note of d minor, the phrygian/neapolitan note
of the home key area
Connotates the closeness of death and morality to life and beauty
Caprice $4: “Hidden Road Polska”
Faster dance in ternary rhythm. Emphasis on 1st and 3rd beats in a lifting
unequal time and danced in a circular whirring manner
Symbolism: The hidden road in the photo is very curvy and twisty, with many
places to speed up and slow down, much like the rhythm of the tune
Caprice #3: Air
Air: in Ireland and Scotland, a slow improv on a known dance tune. Steady
rhythm is completely abandoned in the interest of achieving a steady progression
from one beautiful resting place to a phrase in the next
One of the only caprices that contains perfectly symetrical of bars and phrases;
meant to be played completely freely without a sense of time, which speaks to
the emancipation of attaining perfection, or of observing it in nature
Final Caprice #16
Slip Jig: a dance form common to Ireland. A jig collides with a waltz to form a
double ternary beat pattern, three groups of three beats in each bar
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Symbolism: A branch with one short stalk and three long branches corresponds
to a tune with one short refrain and three longer improvisations; each improv
represents a different character found through the caprices (protagonist,
antagonist, heroine/narrator), and each connect tot he root in a different
way...each time they occur!
It’s up to the performer to decide which connection is the most meaningful
KEY TERMS:
Nyckelharpa: Swedish “Keyed Fiddle”
Composer vs. Arranger: one writes originals and the other makes them sound
different
Caprice: A short free-form piece of music that is often flashy
Binary and ternary: based on groups of two or three, respectively
Schottis: lively dance in binary rhythm
Waltz: moderate flowing dance in ternary rhythm
Polska: quick lifting dance in ternary rhythm
Air: improvisation of a dance tune melody. No rhythm, a wandering between
pretty phase movements
Elements of Music
Pitch: High and low pitches
Melody: the “tune”
Direction: up, down, same, zig-zag, etc.
Motion: stepwise, large leaps, small leaps, stagnant (static), active
(dynamic melody)
E.g. Chopin Prelude in D flat major
Harmony
All the pitches that aren’t making up melody
Contain a selection of pitches that make up an “alphabet” called a “scale”
Two common types of harmonies: major and minor
E.g. Chopin prelude in D flat major- changing from major in beginning to
minor in the middle section
Rhythm: Underlying pulse of the music, called the beat
Meter- how the beats are grouped
Regular or irregular
If it’s regular, it can either be duple (subdivided in to 2) and triple (3)
E.g. Mozart’s Minuet in C Major, K. 409 (regular, triple)
E.g. Aretha Franklin’s Respect (regular, duple)
E.g. Stravinsky (can be both irregular or regular duple)
Tempo (speed): slow, fast, etc.
Texture: how the sounds are combined
Three types
Monophonic- one melody with nothing else going on
Homophonic- one melody with some kind of accompaniment
Polyphonic- several melodic lines at the same time
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version