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POL SCI 139 Study Guide - Comprehensive Midterm Guide: Behavioralism, Kenneth Waltz, Stateless Society


Department
Political Science
Course Code
POL SCI 139
Professor
Bordenkircher, Eric
Study Guide
Midterm

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UCLA
POL SCI 139
MIDTERM EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

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Richard Little, Revisiting Intervention Reading
Two Repeated Observations on Intervention
-1. Often found feature of International Settings
-naturally occurring phenomenon
-great powers intervene in small states and small states w/ one another
-Global Economy’s Interdependence —> Potential Intervention Increases
-2. Intervention as an Ambiguous Concept
-difficult to analyze: non-intervention can be twisted forms of intervention,
disguised intervention —> Ambiguity
-Definition of Intervention
-International Relations, power tries to change the behavior of another power
-This generality and lack of clear definition —> stops analyses into Intervention
Approaches to Intervention
-Two Headings: Behavioralist and Traditionalist
-Either statistical and non-statistical or separation of facts and values or not
-In this case: empirical vs. normative/legalistic
-Behavioralist
-Separation of values from analysis
-Identifying and analyzing a specific area of behavior, intervention is established
by analyst
-not willing to be restrained by their definitions of intervention being done by
themselves
-Traditionalist
-Evolving Political Idea
-Acknowledged ambiguity of Intervention, follows definition of international
lawyers
-unsatisfied w/ boundaries of non-intervention
-The Behavioral Approach
-Rosenau
-Wanted a clear and concise concept of intervention, while maintaining the core
aspects. Also excluded motivations for the action, Economic and Military activity
-2 Attributes that differ it from other forms of state action
-Sharp difference in established behavior of the target state
-changes or preserves structure of political authority in the target state
-Schwartz
-Accepts Rosenau’s definition until going into a detailed comparison
-Military Activity and Behavioralists
-Military force overpowering to the point that resistance is not a war
-Pearson
-difference between domestic disputes and those that affect policy
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-the idea of Civil Wars being associated w/ intervention
-needs an identifiable behavior and action of intervention
-movement of troops is easy identifier
-limited/distorted idea of intervention
-Civil War
-Qualifications for a Civil War vs. a Revolution
-Differentiated Conception of Intervention
The Traditionalist’s View
-No static or ahistorical approach, conflicting conceptions of intervention and changing
over time —> Evolving political idea
-No theory of intervention that doesn’t use the conception employed by practitioners
-Thomas
-attacks Rosenau’s attempt
-idealogical cleavages make finding a definition impossible, accepting a definition
w/o truthfulness
-Normative Perspective
-only understood when compared to non-intervention
-International Lawyers Perspective: dictatorial or coercive by outside party
-only w/ use or threat of military measures
Intervention and the Theory of the State
-Little progress for a broad conception of intervention —> restricted theory of the state
-Sovereign = absolute power —> intervention questions State’s power
-Does not embrace economic dimension when concerning military activity
-State determines what is acceptable interference
-Boundary of the norm of non-intervention
-idea of the state which prevails in society
-distinction between State Societies and Stateless Societies
Defending the non-intervention norm
-responsibility of the international community
-norm is restrictive in stateless societies and extensive in state societies
-based upon power
-defended by the operation of the balance of power system
-regulation with constraints to control the non-intervention norm being broken
-Change of the norm of intervention —> unravels world order
-Radical Proposals for change
-Promotion of democracy through military intervention
-Difficult for great powers to intervene militarily
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