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SOCIOL 101- Final Exam Guide - Comprehensive Notes for the exam ( 45 pages long!)


Department
Sociology
Course Code
SOCIOL 101
Professor
bargheer
Study Guide
Final

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UCLA
SOCIOL 101
FINAL EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

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Essay Questions
Answer two (2) of the three prompts below in an 800 word essay.
Option 1: Theater of Social Interaction
Ten total points. 800 word maximum
Lewis Mumford said that the city is a theater of social interaction. Describe what
he means (2 points), and explain how zoning (4 points) and transportation
planning (4 points) can shape this theater, provide examples of each. Reference
at least three different course texts.
Option 2: Spatial Mismatch
Ten total points. 800 word maximum
What is the spatial mismatch and what academic evidence is there to support
this theory? (4 points) Describe one people-based solution to the mismatch (3
points) and one place- based solution (3 points) to the mismatch. Reference at
least three different course texts.
Option 3: Inequality in Urban America
Ten total points. 800 word maximum
Inequality both exists and is perpetuated in American cities. Provide a critical
analysis of this statement, providing support either in favor or against this
contention. Backup your argument with a minimum of three examples from the
course and include a minimum of three references to course reading materials.
(10 points).
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Lectures
Week1. Lecture #1
Cities, Planning, and Policy
City as theater of social interaction
Lewis Mumford
The city is theater and the city creates theater:
He consistently argued that the physical design of cities and their economic
functions were secondary to their relationship to the natural environment and to
the spiritual values of human communities (Mumford, no pg., what is the city?)
these principles to this architectural criticism for the New Yorker magazine...his
campaign against plans to build a highway through Washington Square in NY in
1959s
City - collection of primary groups and purposive associations
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1. Family and neighborhood
2. Characteristic of city life
Must treat the social nucleus as the essential element in every valid city plan: the
spotting and interrelationship of schools, libraries, theaters, community centers is
the first task in defining the urban neighborhood and laying down the outlines of
an integrated city.
Instead of trusting to the mere massing of population to produce the necessary
social concentration and social drame, must now seek these results through
deliberate local nucleation and a finer regional articulation.
Jane Jacobs
Battled the lies of Robert Moses to preserve the theater of the streets
Modern Planners
Through the application of reason and deliberation planners address urban
problems and opportunities, overcome
Complexity: 󱙌잡성
Longevity
Difference
Forms of plan making continue to evolve 발달, 진화하다
Planners
Social Reform
Guiding the world through science
Focus on experts, the state, and business elites
Social Mobilization
Critiques of capitalism
Focus on power of the people and oppressed
Policy Analysis
Solutions discovered through data analysis
Public administration and neoclassical economics
Social Learning
Theory of knowledge rather than a tradition
Learning by doing, social policy as quasi-experiment
Planners as neutral public servants
Planners as builders of community consensus 합의
Planners as advocates
Planners as agents of radical change
Why social Mobilization is increasingly significant
Weakening of the nation-state; capitol become global
Growing global inequality and poverty
Finite natural resources
Redundancy of labor across the globe through labor-saving technologies
Global debt, especially among emerging economies
Geopolitical tension for global influence between USSR and USA
It is all political
Stakes are emotional
The decisions are visible
It is close at hand
Lay citizens are experts
There are financial consequences
Directly related to property taxes
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find more resources at oneclass.com
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