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Final

EDUC431 Study Guide - Final Guide: Autism Spectrum, Goal Setting, Assistive Technology


Department
Education
Course Code
EDUC431
Professor
Allison Gary
Study Guide
Final

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EDUC 431 Applied Behavior Analysis
Al Cavalier, Ph.D. School of Education University of Delaware
STUDY GUIDE for the NEW CONTENT on the FINAL EXAM Conceptual
Questions
1. What is the primary link between an FBA and a positive BSP? Explain why
it is the primary link.
The Competing Behavior Model provides a way to conceptualize the link between the
information you acquire about a problem situation from an FBA and the components you
design into a positive BSP. When an alternative and desired behavior (i.e., a replacement
behavior) gains the same type of consequence for the student that the problem behavior
produces, the likelihood that the student will choose the alternative behavior increases. In
such a circumstance, the replacement behavior competes with the problem behavior. The
Competing Behavior Model involves seven elements:
1. the setting events for the problem behavior
2. the triggers of the problem behavior (i.e., the immediate antecedents or
predictors)
3. the problem behavior
4. the maintaining consequence(s) of the problem behavior
5. an appropriate alternate behavior (i.e., replacement behavior) that will produce
the same maintaining consequence as the problem behavior.
6. the desired behavior in the situation (i.e., what behavior(s) do you really want
the student to do ...eventually?)
7. the maintaining consequence(s) for that desired behavior.Typically, the desired
behavior will result in a maintaining consequence that is different from the
consequence produced by problem behavior.
The problem situation is represented by the pathway shown in the center of the
diagram (1 – 2 – 3 – 4).
Our short-term goal is for the student to proceed down the competing pathway
represented by 1 – 2 – 5 – 4.
Our long-term goal is the pathway represented by 1 – 2 – 6 7.
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In designing your BSP, you should consider including intervention components
that address each of the elements in the competing behavior model.
What will it take to enable either of the replacement behavior pathways to compete
successfully with the problem behavior pathway?
2. What is the Competing Behavior Model and what is its purpose?
SEE NUMBER 1 & Worksheet
SEE ALSO THE TIP SHEET FOR BSP FOR MODELS OF COMPETING
BEHAVIOR MODEL
A good behavior (replacement behavior) and a bad behavior is competing for a
payoff. we want the replacement behavior to be used most often.
3. What are the assumptions upon which the development of a positive BSP
is based?
The design of an effective positive BSP is based on several assumptions
Assumptions
1. that you have operationally defined the student’s target problem behavior and the
target replacement behavior (review Chapter 3 and Tip Sheet B-9),
2. that you have identified the things/activities that motivate the student (review
Chapter 8 and Tip Sheet F-3),
1. reinforcer menu; interest surveys
b. that you are aware of and will capitalize on the student’s strengths,
c. that you have conducted a revealing functional behavioral assessment (FBA)
about the problem situation (review Chapter 7 and Tip Sheet E-8),
d. that you value skill building (i.e., expansion of the student’s skill repertoire) far
more than you value punishment (review Chapter 9 and Tip Sheets B-14, G-11, &
G-16), and
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e. that you will monitor the plan’s effectiveness and make revisions as needed to
improve the outcomes for the student.
If any of these assumptions are false, you should not design or implement a BSP.
The launching point for your design of a BSP is the Functional Hypothesis about
the target behaviors that you formulated at the end of your FBA.
4. Explain the 6 major focal points in developing a positive BSP.
1. Modify any setting events that serve to increase the likelihood of the problem
behavior's occurrence.
likelihood that the student will engage in the problem behavior? These typically
are things that are more remote in time (e.g., before school begins) and/or place
(e.g., at home) than the actual occurrence of the problem behavior or that are
more global/diffused (e.g., the temperature in the classroom, the physical
setup/arrangement of the environment, the time of day). If your answer is “yes”,
then consider ways that you can eliminate or reduce their influence on the
problem behavior. Decide on and explain any of these strategies that should be a
part of this student’s BSP.
2. Modify one or more aspects of the student's social “environment” to
prevent or reduce occurrences of the problem behavior, and/or change one or
more aspects of the curriculum or instructional methods (triggers) that are
associated with the student's problem behavior.
Social Triggers: Did you identify any social interactions/exchanges between the
student and other persons (peers, teachers, other staff) that, when they occur, often
serve to initiate the problem behavior? If your answer is “yes”, then design a
strategy to eliminate those types of interactions/exchanges or to reduce their
impact that should be a part of this student’s BSP.
Curricular and/or Instructional Triggers: Did you identify any parts or
characteristics of the curriculum or any aspects of your instructional methods and
style that, when they occur, often serve to initiate the problem behavior? If your
answer is “yes”, then consider ways that you can alter the parts/characteristics or
aspects to eliminate or reduce their influence on the problem behavior. Decide on
and explain any of these strategies that should be a part of this student’s BSP.
3. Modify the contingencies so that the student's problem behavior no longer results in
the previous outcomes (pay-offs).
Did you identify any pay-offs (i.e., positive or negative reinforcers) that typically
occur as an outcome of the student’s problem behavior that serve to maintain it in
his/her repertoire. If your answer is “yes”, then design a strategy to (a) remove
these pay-offs or, if that’s not possible, (b) reduce the magnitude of these pay-offs
or, if that’s not possible, (c) suppress their delivery so that the student's problem
behavior is ineffective -- in other words, so that it no longer results in the previous
outcomes.
NOTE: Focal Points 1, 2, & 3 deal with the A-B-Cs of the Problem Behavior.
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