Study Guides (380,000)
US (220,000)
UF (3,000)
SPA (20)
Altman (2)
Study Guide

SPA 3003 Study Guide - Comprehensive Final Exam Guide - Vowel, Obstruent, Consonant


Department
Speech Pathology & Audiology
Course Code
SPA 3003
Professor
Altman
Study Guide
Final

This preview shows pages 1-3. to view the full 59 pages of the document.
SPA 3003

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

In Class Notes on Phonemes and Allophones
8/28/18
Phoneme
o I Liguistis: it’s the sallest uit of speeh that a e used to ake oe ord
different from another
o Phonemes are language specific
And are perceived to be a single distinctive sound in language
Allophones
o Are variants of phonemes that are limited to distribution to particular phonetic
environment
o Other consonants may vary by positions
Like /l/ and /r/
o Vowels!
Each set has allophones of one phoneme
Vowels change a lot by the consonants that surround them
Multiple allophones:
o /t/ - Top, stop, potter, little, kitten
How do you say greatest?
The /t/ sounds like a /d/
o If 2 sounds that are allophones of the same phoneme,
Exchanging one for the other does not change the meaning of the word
o If changing one sound to another changes the meaning of the words,
Those 2 sounds are allophones of different phonemes
Kit vs Kid
She vs See
These words are actually minimal pairs
o Minimal pairs
Actually demonstrate that the sounds that change are from different
phonemes in the language
Minimal pair criteria
o 1. Must have the same number of sounds
o 2. Must differ in only one sound
The pair of sounds that differ in a minimal pair illustrate that those two
sounds represent members of different phonemes
If you have 2 similar sounds and you want to know if they are phonemes
in that language
You would have to find a minimal pair of words in which one is
switched out for the other
Are /b/ and /p/ 2 separate phonemes in English?
YES
o Think about Bat and Pat
Bear and Pear
o Minimal pair examples:
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Lap: Lap and Tap
Chair: Chair and share and bear and chore and hair
Wall: Wall and Ball and call and will
Book: Book and Took
Box: Box and Fox and socks, pox, bops
Thumb: thumb and Dumb, numb, thug, thud
Seam: seam and team, seat seep, seed
Tool: tool and pool, teal, tail,
Saw: saw and law, thaw, paw
Kite: Kite and night and light
o Clinicians use minimal pairs in treatments to demonstrate that phonological
contrast
o Come up with minimal pairs to help distinguish the following sounds
The first sound in THICK and /s/
Thick and sick
Think and sink
Thigh and sigh
/f/ and /h/
Fat and hat
Fight and height
Feet and heat
Found and hound
/g/ and /d/
Gear and dear
Go and doe
Got and dot
/r/ and /w/
Wise and rise
White and right
Ray and way
/l/ ad y
Less and yes
Lucky and yucky
Lawn and yawn
First sound in shoes and /s/
Show and sow
Shine and sign
Shell and sell
Ship and sip
/v/ and /b/
Vase and base
/t/ and /k/
Kite and tight
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version