LAST 170 Midterm Study Guide

7 Pages
194 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Latin American and Caribbean Studies
Course
LAST 170
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Winter

Description
LAST 170 Midterm Exam: Wednesday, March 19 and Friday March 21, 2014.  Wednesday Usual class time 3­4pm  •Students with last names beginning with A­K will take the test in 141 Wohlers Hall •Students with last names beginning with L­Z will take the test in 114 David Kinley Hall  •Please bring a #2 pencil. Friday: students will go to their scheduled discussion sections and take the second part of  the exam.  Short­essay answer: concisely answer the following questions. Be prepared to answer all  of them.  ACTUAL QUESTIONS FOR THE EXAM  1) Consider what you learned in lecture and from the readings by Marisol de la Cadena,  Guimarae ̃s, Goldstein,Vaughan, and Stout. Discuss how people are racialized in Brazil, Cuba, and  Bolivia (de la Cadena focuses on Peru, but for the sake of an argument apply her ideas to the  general Andean Region that includes both Bolivia and Peru). Be sure to cover the following  issues:  a) What historical conditions explain the high level of inequality in these countries? Why are  socio­economic conditions connected to race? b) Provide one concrete example from the readings that shows how constructions of race in  Brazil, Cuba or the Andean Region are similar, and one concrete example from the readings to  show how they are different.  c) Discuss how media is used as part of the process of racialization. Use one example provided in  class to explain your argument.  ______________________________________________________________________________  2) Considering the movie “Even the Rain” and from the readings by Barron, Thomson, Spronk,  and Monasterios discuss the connections between extraction process, natural resources and social  movements in Bolivia.  a) Explain what the connections are between the extraction process, natural resources and social  movements in Bolivia? Use one example from the movie and one example from the reading to  develop your answer. b) Explain the origin of the “water war”, the different positions regarding the use/property of  water, the different actors/social groups and their different positionalities.  c) Considering the movie “Even the Rain” and Trouillot’s (1995) reading about the socio­ historical process and historical narratives, discuss an example from the movie in which the  “cycle of silence” has a repercussion in the historical  Format: 3 mini­essay answer; 40­60 multiple­choice questions; 5­10 fill­in­the­blank  questions; and 5­10 two­sentence answers.  narrative that’s articulated in the movie. How does that “moment of silence” impact the characters  in the movie?  ______________________________________________________________________________  3) Consider what you learned in lecture and from the readings by Brenner, Vaughan and Stout and  discuss Revolutionary Cuba. Be sure to cover the following issues:  a) What historical conditions (long term and short term) lead to the Triumph of the Revolution on  January 1, 1959?  b) Explain two concrete changes enacted by the Revolutionary government during its first years  of existence and explain two examples of some of the early and recent challenges of the  Revolution.  c) Discuss how tourism becomes a two­fold space to continue and contest the revolution.  Two Sentence Answers: Identify the person/ terms. Your first sentence should  answer who or what the term refers to. Your second sentence should point out one  reason why this person/term is significant to our class.  EXAMPLES a) Raul Castro: Current president of Cuba replacing his brother Fidel. Raul, Fidel, and  Ernesto ‘El Che’ Guevara were central figures in the Cuban Revolution, and its triumph  in 1958­59. b) Mercantilism: Economic theory that proposes that a nation’s wealth should be  measured in bullion, that a country should export more than it import, and that promotes  active state participation, strong sea power, and the possession of colonies for economic  growth. The Spanish empire during the colonial period was guided by this orientation. c) Potosí Mining city in Bolivia, exploited since the early 1600s by colonial Spain.  Today, Potosí is tremendously poor and its mining continues under horrible working  conditions.  REVIEW MATERIALS:  Conceptual considerations:  Discuss paradoxes and four orientations with which John Chasteen characterizes the  changing foci of U.S. thinking on Latin America from the early 20th century to the  present.  • Young and Old  •  History that is both tumultuous and stable  •  Independent and dependent  •  Prosperous and Poor  •  Multi­ethnic countries but racism still exists  Racial/Cultural and Environmental Determinism • Racist explanations • indigenous population and racial mixture creates a bad population • region needed European immigration • Spanish catholic heritage inferior to English protestant • weather is bad for economic activity and progress Modernization Theory • Underdeveloped countries need to be modernized and become developed  countries Dependency Theory • Underdeveloped countries are dependent on developed countries Social Constructionism  • Contemporary perspective on latin America  • Recognizing cultural complexities of Latin America • Identify politics: gender, race, class, religion, national and regional identities • How do these become meaningful to people? Discuss Michel Rolph Trouillot’s theory of historical narratives  •History understood as the distinction and overlap of the socio­ historical process (“what  happened”) and the narratives about it (“what is said to have happened”). Which of the following was NOT argued by Michel Rolph Trouillot in regard to historical narratives?  1. a)  We are all simultaneously historical actors and historical narrators.  2. b)  History is stored in our collective memories, ready to be accessed at will.  3. c)  Historical narratives set up a field of power relations that influence what we consider to be  relevant or trivial in past and present social relations.  4. d)  There are many moments of silencing of historical events in the process of creating, archiving,  and narrating historical “facts”  So what is history for Trouillot?  •  a) An objective, accurate account of the socio­historical process (“what happened”).  •  b) A subjective account, presented as a historical narrative (“What is said to have happened”).  •  c) The dialectic between the sociohistorical process and historical narratives.  •  d) None of the above.  •Three capacities people have within socio­historic processes: actors­ people “doing”, in  constant interface with a context, agents – people in relation to other people, subjects  ­people “experiencing,” with the capacity to give voice to their experiences and  conditions  Cycles of silences Fact creation (the making of sources) Fact assembly (the making of archives) Fact retrieval (the making of narratives)  Retrospective significance (the making of history in the final instance)  Discuss the premises of mercantili
More Less

Related notes for LAST 170

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit