[HISTART 101] - Midterm Exam Guide - Comprehensive Notes for the exam (17 pages long!)

109 views17 pages
7 Feb 2017
School
Department

For unlimited access to Study Guides, a Grade+ subscription is required.

U of M
HISTART 101
MIDTERM EXAM
STUDY GUIDE
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
Unlock all 17 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
Unlock all 17 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in
Lecture 1: Introduction to Art
GOALS
1. Visual images - basic viewing/thinking skills, making intelligent conversation about works of
“art” and other images we encounter every day
2. Global understanding of image making and the social construction of vision
3. Enhance critical thinkings skills and cognitive flexibility
WHY LEARN ABOUT ART?
New York art auction in 2014 - over four days, $1.66 billion was spent on postwar and contemporary art
- There are economics behind the paintings; art has monetary value and paintings before
reproduction
- There are also a separation of classes because not everyone has access to culture through art (very
costly at times)
- Historically, art has been a reflection of wealth
Provenance of Vermeer’s Art of Painting
- Art objects have their own life stories as they are passed down generation to generation, acquiring
significance through its owners
- Vermeer’s painting was passed down from the painter’s wife to Hitler, which reflected
the looting of art by the Nazis (art was eventually passed on to museums)
The Ruins of the Ancient City of Palmyra - Before and After ISIS
Ancient city, which was at the center of conflict represents political importance
- Ideas of nation states and nationality are reflected through art
- ISIS broke apart art that did not align with their views
- Large Buddha of Bamiyan, (Afghanistan), constructed 554 CE before and after destruction in
2008
Art is a political issue
- Bill protecting works of arts lent by foreign institutions passes US Senate (12/16)
- Supporters: legislation will encourage cultural exchange
- Opponents: legislation will block restitution of works seized in countries like Russia
- Russia and the US have not traded art since 2011
- What was in the news that day for art in our everyday lives
- Implications of art through politics, money, business, etc.
Damien Hirst, The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living
- Shark - art is a moving target dependent on the target in which it exists - some things are
considered to be art now, but were not before
- The value/credibility of the art depends on if it’s in museum or not
- The definition of “art” has to do with perception
ART AS A MOVING TARGET
Hint: Not your parents’ Art History
- The quote points fun at how to people tend to view art/how people can pretend to understand art
Art/Not Art?
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
Unlock all 17 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in
- Maps - as references to in discussion, art is based on the intention of the person making it (art or
not), and they are very temporal because an informational map in the past may be considered a
work or art present day (reception of the art)
- The context (books/gallery) in which the art was created is also very important because
you learn about the culture where it was made, so maps tend to have inaccurate scales to
emphasize importance of different areas/countries (history is written by the victors)
- Convention also identifies the object as art or not - maps usually have compasses and
symbols to be more informative rather than to merely be observed
- Europeans in the past used to have maps on their walls as decorations
Claudius Ptolemy's Geographia
- Although objective at the time, the map is now considered to be art
- Art is based on how we perceive images; different conventions give us different ways of reading
images
- The heads for the winds were objective symbols, such as the compass today
- The map was printed in a book about geography in 1482 (Florence)
Heinrich Bünting, The Entire World in a Cloverleaf
- Medieval (1581) tradition of maps (tripartite - three parts)
- The format of the map (clover shape) imaginatively refers to the coat of arms of the
author’s native city, Hannover
- Bünting put the world in his own view, but there is still information relayed in
the map, which correspond to the real world’s artist’s interpretation
- There are varying amounts of usable information
- America is out in the bottom corner and says the new world, which reflects how limited
the Europeans knowledge still was
- England and Dennenland (region of Belgium) are separated as well
- Although it is now considered to be art, this map was informative at the time and there
are different symbols in the ocean
- Jerusalem is always in the middle - religious context behind the painting
Art/not art?
Either way, images reflect and shape the way we see (imagine) the world
- There are shifting targets and the images plant ideas into your head about the shape and the
relationships
IBM logo
- 5 bright idea rays - another representation of the world, which says certain things about
themselves
- Read the lines: global North/richer OR ideas/light marks
- The old logo from 1912 evokes the earth without specifically depicting it
- They changed it in 2011 for the centennial
Unofficial IBM centennial greeting - August 2011 designed by Christian Jakob, Wiesbaden
- IBM - Think Smart
- Different realms of research - medicine, shopping, urban, technology/cloud
- You can read them as images and associate them with certain ideas
Science on a Sphere - created by NOAA to teach earth sciences (six foot wide)
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
Unlock all 17 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in

Get access

Grade+
$10 USD/m
Billed $120 USD annually
Homework Help
Class Notes
Textbook Notes
40 Verified Answers
Study Guides
1 Booster Class