Study Guides (248,413)
United States (123,380)
Psychology (715)
PSYCH 230 (46)
All (26)
Midterm

Psych 230 Exam 2 Notes

9 Pages
74 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 230
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Fall

Description
Psych 230 Exam 2 Notes  Lecture 9: October 3, 2013 (missed class) ­Sensory Receptors determine our view of the world  Photoreceptors sensitive for infrared and ultraviolet radiation Olfactory receptors sensitive for oxygen, pheromones, or genetic proximity  Auditory receptors for ultrasound, infrasound  Sensors for meagnetic fields  More than 3 types of cones  Synthetic perception ­Our world is based on the PERCEPTION of incredibly small parts of the spectrum of  electromagnetic energy, of the frequency of pressure waves and of a couple of chemical  compounds  ­Make us who we are but they also keep us in the dark about a lot of the realities of the  world  ­women can smell genetic closeness. They prefer the smell of people that are  close genetically to them  Fundamental Operations of Sensory Systems  ­Nature and limits of sensory stimuli  ­Receptors  ­Sensory transduction  ­Coding of sensory information  ­Principles of sensory information processing in the brain  Phillipine tarsier: has no cones, atypical retino­geniculate projection system;  special fovea structure to overcome resolution limits; peripheral photoreceptors sensitive  to UV?  Bald Eagle: extremely binocular; two fovea per retina; special fovea structure to  overcome resolution limits Stimuli and sensory receptors  ­Stimulus: Event or physical event that can produce a sensory response Mechanical:  Touch­ contact with or deformation of body surface  Hearing­ sound vibrations in air or water Vestibular­ head movement and orientation  Joint­ position and movement  Muscle­ tension  Photic:  Seeing­ visible radiant energy  Thermal:  Cold­ decrease in skin temperature  Warmth­ increase in skin temperature  Chemical:  Smell­ odorous substances dissolved in air or water in the nasal cavity Taste­ substances in contact with the tongue or other taste receptor  Common chemical­ changes in CO2, pH, osmotic pressure  Vomerosnasal­ pheromones in air or water  Electrical:  Electroreception­ differences in density of electrical currents  sensory receptor organs: “specialized neurons forming input organs”, designed to  translate physical energy (stimuli) into the neuronal code: transduction *sensory receptors are transducers (translating physical energy into what the neuron can  deal with) ­“unusual” receptors for: infrared radiation, electrical energy, magnetic fields, ultrasonic  sound  ­Receptor capacities: completely determine the extent of information extracted from the  outside world  iclicker: In the context of sensory processing transduction refers to: A*** ­Skin receptors for pain, temperature, touch, vibration, and stretch.  ­Free nerve endings­ pain, temperature  ­Merkel’s disc­ touch  ­meissner’s corpuscle­ touch  ­hair follicle receptor­touch ­pacinian corpuscle­ vibration and pressure  ­ruffini’s ending­ stretch  transduction mechanisms:  ­Ex. a mechanoreceptor, the Pacinian corpuscle  ­Filippo Pacini  The Pacinian Corpuscle:  1) Mechanical deformation of the corpuscle  2) Leads to stretched nerve ending  3) Allows sodium influx  4) Sensory­induced excitatory potential: GENERATOR POTENTIAL (comparabe  to EPSPs)  ­when excited, the membrane stretches and sodium flows in  ­when at rest, the ion channels are too small for the sodium to flow in  Transduction versus coding: stimulus intensity is encoded by the frequency of action  potentials  ­the more you press, the more action potentials will be fired= coding  ­we have transducers for ultraviolet light in our skin, but not in our eyes  Adaptation: reflects the brain’s bias for new stimuli  ­your sensory neurons care about new stuff. Old stuff they do not care that much  about.  ­old things: the feeling of your shirt on your skin, you will not find that stimulus  in the brain.  Iclicker question: Stimulation of a pacinian corpuscle causes which of the following  events to occur first: mechanically­gated sodium channels open  Labeled lines: different types of information is picked up by different receptors and  exported to the brain via specialized connections; employ different speeds (labeled lines  have different thickness of axons.. thicker axons=message travels faster than thinner  axons) Proprioception (body sense): muscle spindle—fastest (axon with largest diameter) Touch: pacinian corpuscles, ruffini’s endings, merke’s discs, meissner’s  corpuscles—next fastest Pain, temperature: free nerve endings—3  fastest  Temperature, pain, itch: free nerve endings­ slowest (axon with smallest diameter) *PROBLEM: As the firing rate of neurons is limited (refractory period) to a couple of  100 impulses/s how can we perceive super low levels as well as super­intense stimuli (ex.  very dim and very bright light)?  ** Range Fractionation: different sensory receptors (and thus sensory neurons)  specialize for detecting fractions of the intensity scale; a wide range of intensity values  can be perceive by sensory neurons that are optimally sensitive to a fraction of the  intensity scale.. multiple transducers that have different intensitites for their threshold  After the sensory receptors in the skin:  ­goes to the medulla and makes its first synapse ­another synapse to the thalamus, then you are in the cortex  ­everything you do on the right, your left body is affected  from skin to brain: the dorsal column system  1) Touch receptors detect stimulation of the skin and send action potentials along  axons that enter dorsal roots of the spinal cord. This axon is part of a unipolar neuron, the  cell body of which resides in the dorsal root ganglion.  2) once the axon enters the spinal cord dorsal horn, it joins the dorsal column of  white matter and ascends to the brain  3) in the medulla, the axon from the periphery makes it’s first synapse,  innervating a neuron of the dorsal column nuclei. This medullary neuron in turn sends its  axon across the middle and up to the thalamus.  4) at this point, the left thalamus will be receiving information about the right side  of the body. The thalamus will in turn send this information to the somato­sensory cortex Topographic representation of receptor surface in the brain:  ­adjacent areas on the receptive surface sheet remain represented together throughout the  nervous system: topographic organization or topographic maps  ­disproportional representation of densely innervated areas (lips, fovea)  ­things we are very sensitive to sensory neurons take up a large part in the brain  sensory information is processed at all levels of the neuroaxis:  ­top down modulation of sensory input processing: brain influences sensory input  processing at all levels  (receptors to sensory peripheral nerves) spinal cord ▯ (receptors to sensory cranial  nerves) ▯ brainstem ▯ halamus ▯▯primary sensory cortical areas ▯ on­primary sensory  cortical areas Receptive fields and receptive field organization  ­receptive field is the area that sends a sensory signal to the brain  ­we are finding out what the brain and what it does with that by looking at the receptive  fields  ­they are normally organized, but they can vary into multiple compartments  ­on off properties­forelimb receptive field (when you touch it it is on) (when you touch  another area it is off)  ­cells like contrast  **it is not the sensory organ that has a receptive field (RF); the RF is a property of the  individual (cortical, thalamic, etc.) neuron!  Lecture 10: October 8, 2013 (audio recording) Lecture 9 Review:  Question: which of the following statements, about transduction, coding  and adaptation, is/are correct: E: all of the above  ­sensory receptors are transducers, meaning that they transform physical energy, such as touch to  changes in the neuronal membrane potential  ­“coding” concerns the translation of stimulus intensity into action potential frequency  ­in sensory neurons a greater stimulus intensity causes a higher frequency of AP ­“adaptation” refers to the rapid return of stimulus evoked increases in sensory neurons firing  frequency to baseline, if the stimulus does not change.  transduction and sports…  to show how fantastic the transducers in our eyes are­ basketball video 2 teams, 3 guys in white shirts and 3 guys in black shirts.. count number of passes between white  shirt guys.. 11 passes… a woman with an umbrella walks through and you don’t see her the first  time. The women was on our retina but we did not perceive her because we were fooled with  instructions.  We were set up top down to focus all our attention on the passes, and therefore the woman on the  retina did not reach the level of processing we need for conscious perception. Our attention was  completely consumed by one aspect of the event.  Sensory information is processed at all levels of the neuroaxis  Top­down modulation of sensory input processing: brain influences sensory input processing at all  levels  Basketball movie: distracter was on your retina, but was filtered “top­down”, never analyzed to the  degree that you gained awareness of the presence of this stimulus (the woman walking with  umbrella)..  Top­down influences: invalidate eye witness reports… failure to detect because of top­down control  illustrates the power of top down control of sensory input processing.   ­at end of the day there are stimuli that will capture our attention and we will see it (new,  unexpected stuff) but most of the time in an average day you go through the world and you are  controlled by your top down expectations, see what you know and expect. If you are given  instructions to look for something, all the other stuff you will not see. Basketball movie is a great  way to see the power of top down processing  Lecture 10:  Cdenter­surround organization of receptive fields of neurons:  On­center/Off­surround  Off­Center/On surround  Opponent cells: *[definition] To emphasize contrasts (edges, discontinuities)  Ex. stimulus sweeping across an on­center/off surround RF:  as stimulus moves across RF from left to right: When stimulus is in surroun
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 230

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit