Test 3 Study Guide.docx

7 Pages
103 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Communication
Course
COMM 121
Professor
West
Semester
Spring

Description
COMM TEST 3 STUDY GUIDE LECTURE: RACE & ETHNICITY Awareness of Inequality • Media content reproduces the inequalities that exist in society • White, middle­class, well­educated (publicly) heterosexual me have dominated  production and content of mass media • Representations are not reality •  Social constructi : no representation of reality can ever be fully ‘true’ because  everything must be frames o People are grouped into certain categories (race, gender, sexuality, geography,  ability, intellect) and some categories are privileged (white, male, heterosexual,  coastal, able­bodied, educated) over other (non­white, female, transsexual,  homosexual, middle, disabled, uneducated) Race • Race was ‘made up’ to mark differences between people, especially based on skin color • Issues when considering how racial/ethnic groups are portrayed in media: o  Inclusion : are members of races/ethnicities other than white included in texts? o  Roles : what parts do people of color play? o  Control : who creates media texts?  •  Stuart Hall,   The Whites of their Eyes  o Racism is one of the most profoundly ‘naturalized’ of existing ideologies o Media dominates ideological production; what they ‘produce’ represents the  social world, images, frames, etc. o The media helps define ‘race’ and reveals the dominant ideology of the ‘white  eye’  o  Overt racism : argumentative, openly racist testament o  Inferential racis : naturalized representations of bodies of color  o Many programs have unconscious racism, meaning blacks are the source of the  problem o “Grammar of race”, with racist stereotypes (Mammy, native, etc.) CROTEAU & HOYNES CHAPTER 6: SOCIAL INEQUALITY & MEDIA  REPRESENTATION • How do media representations of social world compare to the external ‘real’ world? • Human agency has created changes in social world which have affected organization of  media industry Comparing Media Content & ‘Real’ World • Impact of media can actually become more significant if media products diverge  dramatically from real world; ex. more concerned when content lacks diversity or  overemphasize sex, violence, etc. • Representations are not reality (even if tempted to judge them as such); they Represent  the social world, incomplete and narrow • Media does not try to reflect real world (sci­fi would not exist, etc.) • There is social significance in media, even if it is fantasy •  Social constructionist perspect : no representation of reality can ever be totally  ‘true’/’real’ because it must frame an issue and choose to include/exclude certain  components of a reality • Media often escape from reality for some; so how ‘real’ it is can be irrelevant The Significance of Content • Researchers assess significance of media content in five ways: o Content as reflection of producers o Content as reflection of audience preference o Content as reflection of society in general o Content as an influence on audiences o Content as self­enclosed text (meaning must be ‘decoded’) Race, Ethnicity, Media Content: Inclusion, Roles, & Control •  Race : socially constructed concept, varied over time/cultures •  Ethnicit : shared cultural heritage, often derives from common ancestry and homeland,  also a cultural creation • Absence of a racial signifier in the US usually means “whiteness” • Whiteness is an unspoken backdrop; media tends to focus on portrayal of minorities o Black Mammy, Indian Maiden, Latin Lover, Asian Warlord are all products of  white producers, bear little resemblance to racial realities Racial & Ethnic Diversity in Media Content • Film o 1920s­30s, blacks were either entertainer or servant, limited number of roles  available • Television o 1940s­60s, entertainer/comedians; no serious roles, blacks often featured in  minority casts, although today diversity is staple of primetime TV • Early Images of Race o Whites performed racist stage acts portraying blacks as buffoons in blackface o Birth of a Nation (DW Griffith), Asians as violent villains/exotic, etc. • Race and Class o Middle­class blacks have become mainstream in primetime o News/coverage documentaries tend to focus on underclass, crime, etc. o Because some blacks have clearly succeeded, failure of other blacks is seen as  their own fault o Primacy of ‘color line’ being challenged by generational, gender, and class  differences o No longer can a single set of media images represent a racial group • Controlling Media Images of Race o Affluent, white men historically control 
More Less

Related notes for COMM 121

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit