Psychology Exam Notes.docx

7 Pages
109 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology & Brain Sciences
Course
PSYCH 100
Professor
Susan Krauss Whitbourne
Semester
Fall

Description
Psychology Exam Notes Memory: • Memory is the process by which we encode, store, and retrieve information.  • Encoding information is the most important for having a good memory.  • Type of memory: 1. Sensory memory: includes sight and sound and lasts for 1 second.  2. Working memory: visual/spatial store, auditory store, and central executive;  lasts for 15­25 seconds. 3. Long­term memory: includes implicit and explicit memory and is stored  permanently. • Types of Long­term memory: 1. Declarative Memory: factual information. It includes Semantic memory  (general memory) and Episodic memory (personal knowledge)  2. Procedural memory: skills and habits, emotional, and priming.  • Tip­of­the­tongue phenomenon: the inability to recall information that one  realizes one knows. • Flashbulb memories: memories related to specific, important, or surprising  events that are recalled easily with a vivid imagery.  • Proactive interference: interference in which information learned earlier  disrupts the recall of material learned later.  • Retroactive interference: interference in which material that was learned  later disrupts the retrieval of information that was learned earlier.  An  example is taking a test.  • Cue­ dependent forgetting: forgetting that occurs when there are insufficient  retrieval cues to rekindle information that is in memory.  • Implicit memory: memory that you don’t try to learn. • Explicit memory: memory that you deliberately try to learn.  • Decay: the loss of information in memory through its nonuse.  • Types of sensory memory: 1. Echoic memory: which stores auditory memories. 2. Iconic memory: which stores visual memories.  • Recall: memory task in which specific information must be retrieved.  • Recognition: memory task in which individuals are presented with a  stimulus and asked whether they have been exposed to it in the past or to  identify it from a list of alternatives.  • Levels­of­processing theory: the theory in memory that emphasizes the  degree to which new material is mentally analyzed.  • Retrograde amnesia: amnesia in which memory is lost for occurrences prior  to a certain event, but not for new events. • Anterograde amnesia: amnesia in which memory is lost for events that  follow an injury.  • Korsakoff’s syndrome: a disease that afflicts long­term alcoholics, leaving  some abilities intact but including hallucinations and a tendency to repeat  the same story.  Problem­solving: • Characteristics of a well­defined problem: 1. The problem has a clearly defined given state. 2. There is a finite set of operators.  3. The problem has a clear goal.  • Robin is a prototype of the concept “bird” • Transformation Problems.  • Algorithm: a rule that, if applied appropriately, guarantees a solution to a  problem.  • Heuristic: a thinking strategy that may lead us to a solution to a problem or  decision, but may lead to some errors.  • Insight: a sudden awareness of the relationships among various elements  that had previously appeared to be independent of one another.  • Functional fixedness: the tendency to think of an object only in terms of its  typical use.  Ex. Book used to read or as a doorstop. • Divergent thinking: thinking that generates unusual, yet nonetheless  appropriate, responses to problems or questions.  Language: • An example of phonemes is “a” is fat and fate. • An example of morphemes is any word or prefix.  • Nativist approach: the theory that genetically determined, innate  mechanism directs language development. (Universal language) • 75­225 words • Evidence shows that bilingual speakers have more cognitive flexibility than  monolingual speakers.  Intelligence:  • Fluid Intelligence: Intelligence that reflects the ability to reason abstractly.  Solving a puzzle is an example of fluid intelligence.  • Crystalized intelligence: the accumulation of information, skills, and  strategies that are learned through experience and can be applied in  problem­solving situations. Pre­tests are examples of crystalized  intelligence.  • Practical intelligence: according to Sternberg, intelligence related to overall  success in living.  • Types of Intelligences:  1. Musical Intelligence: skills in tasks involving music. Example:  Menuhin was an international performer by the age of 10. 2. Bodily Kinesthetic Intelligence: skills in using the whole body or  various portions of it in the solution of problems or in the  construction of products or displays. Example: athletes, dancers,  surgeons.  3. Logical­mathematical intelligence: skills in problem solving and  scientific thinking. Example: Barbara discovered a solution to a  problem after half an hour.  4. Linguistic Intelligence: skills involved in the production and use of  language. Example: Eliot’s magazine. 5. Spatial Intelligence: Skills involving spatial configurations, such as  those used by artists and architects. Example: Turks navigate  through the sea.  6. Interpersonal Intelligence: skills in interacting with others, such as  sensitivity to the moods, temperaments, motivations, and intentions  of others. Example: socializing effectively with others.  7. Intrapersonal Intelligence: knowledge of the internal aspects of  oneself; access to one’s own feelings and emotions. Exampl
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 100

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit