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AAS 330 Study Guide - Spring 2019, Comprehensive Final Exam Notes - Wyoming, White Supremacy, White Southerners


Department
Afro-American Studies
Course Code
AAS 330
Professor
Dr. Kendra Gage
Study Guide
Final

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AAS 330

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In the Beginning. . .
Coming of Age
What was her early life like in Mississippi? (examples of family, first interactions, ideals racial constructs,
impact of Emit Till)
How does she get involved in civil rights activities, what are those activities, and why are others
reluctant to become involved? (what factors are important in Mississippi?)
Why dos she become disillusioned with MLK and the movement?
Establishment of Trade
Trade in people- why trade their own, their prisoners of war
Greed
Establish more land/weapons/superiority
Ma’afa
African holocaust
Establishment by Law
Treatment of those indentured slaves from Africa and slaves from others (1619)-becomes set in court
and then in law
It’s okay to whip indentured servants-form of discipline
Under care for certain amount of time (7 and 15 years) and then become free
afterwards
John Punch (July 1640)-sentenced to serve the rest of his life for running away
1641-Massachusetts-1st colony to legally recognize slavery
1662-Passed law stating all children born to a slave mother would be enslaved
Laws passed about owning property, contracts, chattel, violence
Chattel: determination of property that is forever yours
Wives
Justifications
Taking care of them
Treating them better than they deserve
Divine providence
God gave them the right to guide the cursed tribe
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Forms of Resistance
Day to day resistance (most common)
Breaking tools
Sick
Slowing down
Arson and sabotage
Run away
Rebellion
Maroon communities: stick together after running away and are in the woods
How is Culture Preserved?
Naming
Foodways
Got all the scraps that became mainstream
Religion
Mixture of Christianity and African folklore
Language- Gullah
Creole
Different ways of speech
Folktales
Rabbit
Nation Increases in Size
Already an anti-slavery movement
Colonization in other areas
Liberia
Going back to Africa, no way blacks and whites can get along
Pay “owners”
Doesn’t replace the labor
Compromise of 1850
Popular sovereignty
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