Ed Psych review2.docx

3 Pages
128 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychological & Quantitative Foundations
Course
PSQF 1075
Professor
Stephen Alessi
Semester
Spring

Description
Ch. 8: complex cognitive processes Metacognition: knowledge about our own thinking processes. Higher order, used to  monitor and regulate cognitive processes (reasoning, comprehension etc.) Involves three  types of knowledge:  1) Declarative­ the factors that influence your learning (what to do) 2) Procedural­ how to use strategies 3) Conditional­ knowing when and why to apply the procedures Three skills that allow us to do this:  1) Planning 2) Monitoring  3) Evaluating  Most useful when tasks are challenging, but not too difficult. These processes may be  automatic. Abilities develop around 5­7. Two questions helped: what did you learn about  yourself as a reader/writer today? And What did you learn that you can do again and  again?  Learning Strategies and Tactics: ideas for accomplishing learning goals. Learning  tactics are the specific techniques that make up the plan. Important principles: exposure  to different strategies, taught conditional knowledge about when and where to use certain  strategies, develop the desire to use these skills, direct instruction in schematic  knowledge.  Decide what is important, use summaries, underlining and highlighting (use sparingly) To ensure that students apply learning strategies: make task appropriate, encourage  valuing of learning, students must believe the effort is worth it given the return, and they  must have self­efficacy for using strategies.  Visual Organizing Tools: Identify main ideas, understand the organization. Creating  maps or charts can be more effective than outlining. Cmaps (concept maps using  computer)  Problem Solving and Problem solving strategies: a problem has an initial state, a goal  and a path. Often need to make sub­goals, and problems can be ill and well structured.  Problem solving is defined as formulating new answers, going beyond the simple  application of previously learned rules to achieve a goal. Debate regarding problem  solving: some think that strategies are domain specific and others believe they are  general. IDEAL:  Identify problems* representation is really important  Define goals (focusing attention, understanding words, understanding whole prob.) Explore strategies Anticipate outcomes and Act Look back/Learn Your interpretation of a problem is the translation (translate into a schema you get) Schema driven problem solving: recognizing a problem as a disguised version of an old  problem for which one already has a solution.  Algorithm: step by step procedure for solving a problem. Applying them unsystematically  can indicate formal operational thinking is underdeveloped. Heuristic: general strategy that might lead to the right answer Means­end analysis: problem is divided into a number of intermediate goal or sub­goals  and then a means of solving each intermediate sub­goal is figured out.  Working backward strategy: heuristic in which one starts with the goal and moves  backward to solve the problem Analogical thinking: limit the search for solutions to situations that are similar Factors that hinder problem solving: fixation (inability to use objects/tools in a new way)  response set (tendency to response in the most familiar way) Problems with heuristics:  representative heuristics (judging the likelihood of an event based on how well the events  match your prototypes) or by invoking stereotypes, availability heuristic (believing that  easily memorable events are common) belief perseverance (tendency to hold on to our  beliefs, even in the face of contradictory info) confirmation bias (tendency to search for  information that confirms our ideas and beliefs).  What do experts do? Insight, intuition, condition­action schemas, domain knowledge    Creativity: the ability to produce work that is original but still appropriate and useful.   Sources include domain relevant skills, creativity relevant processes, and intrinsic task  motivation.  Restructuring a problem usually results in a sudden insight after a period of incubation  where the problem is set aside for a while. 
More Less

Related notes for PSQF 1075

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit