Abnormal Review.docx

10 Pages
51 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY 3320
Professor
Michael O' Hara
Semester
Spring

Description
Abnormal Review:  Chapter 7: Somatoform and Dissociative Disorders Somatoform disorders: the individual complains of bodily symptoms that suggest a  physical defect/dysfunction but no physiological basis can be found.  • Pain disorder: person experiences pain that causes significant distress and  impairment.  o Psychological factors play a role in the onset and maintenance of pain.  This pain differs from physical pain descriptions in localization,  description and situational linkage.   Validating that pain is real  Relaxation training  Rewards for toughing it out  Coping mechanisms, control exercises and greater activity • Body dysmorphic disorder: person is preoccupied with an imagined or  exaggerated defect in appearance.  o Women, late adolescence o Comorbid: social phobia, depression and personality disorders • Hypochondriasis: Preoccupation with fears of having a serious illness o Chronic, early adulthood  o Comorbid: Anxiety and mood disorders  CBT­restructure pessimistic thinking  Pointing out selective attention, discouraging seeking medical attention • Conversion disorder: Sensory or motor symptoms without any physiological  cause o Paralysis, anesthesia’s, insensitivities, aphonia, anosmia (often doesn’t  make anatomical sense) o Originally called hysteria,  o Adolescence/early adulthood­trigger  Freudian theory­ unexpressed affect, electra complex  Behavioral theory­malingering, had experience with the problem  and are modeling that behavior  Social/Cultural­ sexual leniency, low SES  Biological­ genetic factors are unimportant  • Somatization disorder: Recurrent, multiple physical complaints that have no  biological basis o Four pain symptoms in different locations o Two gastrointestinal symptoms o One sexual symptom other than pain o One pseudo­neurological symptom o Comorbid: Anxiety disorders, mood disorders, substance abuse and  personality disorders o Women (Hispanic and Black), patients, early adulthood  Heritable  More sensitive to physical sensations, overly aware  High cortisol levels  Assertion and social skills training  Relaxation training, CBT  Biofeedback  Minimize the use of diagnostic tests, maintain contact with patient regardless  of complaints  Redirecting attention to depression or anxiety  Dissociative disorders: the individual experiences disruptions of consciousness, memory  and identity  • Dissociative Amnesia: Memory loss following a stressful experience o Disappears quickly, low recurrence rate • Dissociative fugue: Memory loss accompanied by leaving home and establishing  a new identity o Usually complete recovery, more extreme than Amnesia • Depersonalization disorder: Experience of the self is altered o AT least two ego states, or alters. Chronic and severe o Childhood, diagnosed in adulthood, Women o Comorbid: Depression, BPD, Somatization disorder • Dissociative Identity disorder: At least two distinct ego states (alters) that act  independently of each other, formerly MPD o Comorbid: PTSD, Anxiety, Depression  Child abuse­ unresolved conflict, combined with biological  diathesis  Learned social role enactment  Reliving traumatic trigger events in safe environment  Eye Movement desensitization, Reprocessing Therapy, Hypnosis  Focusing on improving anxiety and depression symptoms Chapter 8: Psychophysiological Disorders and Health Psychology Psychophysiological disorder: genuine physical symptoms that are caused or can be  worsened by psychological factors. They involve damage to the body • Stress and Health: some environmental condition that triggers psychopathology o General Adaptation Syndrome (Seyle):  1. Alarm reaction­ ANS activated 2. Resistance­ damage occurs or adaptation occurs 3. Exhaustion­ death or serious irreversible damage occurs • Coping and Stress o Stressors­ can be positive or negative, anything that requires adaptation o Coping styles­ effectiveness varies with situation  Problem­focused: taking direct ation to solve the problem (pacing  assignments)  Emotion­focused: reduce the negative emotional reactions to stress  (distraction, relaxation)  Avoidance: attempting to avoid admitting that there is a problem or  neglecting to do something about it (least effective) o Social Readjustment Rating Scale­ uses marriage as an anchor point,  ratings are totaled to produce a Life Change Unit score. Problems include  items can be both causes and predictors of stress) o Assessment of Daily Experience: uses non­retrospective techniques to  investigate daily stressors which have been shown to lead to illness.  o Social support  Structural­ person’s basic network of social relationships (marital  status and # of friends)  Functional­ the quality of a person’s relationships  • Biological –  o Somatic weakness theory­ connection between stress and a particular  psychophysiological disorder is a weakness in a specific bodily organ.  (asthma) o Specific­reaction theory­ individuals have unique ways of responding, and  the body system that is most responsive becomes a candidate for the locus  of subsequent psychophysiological disorder.  (hypertension) o Allostatic load­ the continued need for the body to adapt. Body may  become overexposed to stress hormones and thus susceptible to disease  due to altered immune function.  • Psychoanalytic­ (anger­in theory) specific conflicts and their associated negative  emotional states give rise to psychophysiological disorders Cardiovascular disorder: diseases involving the heart and blood­circulation  system •  Hypertension ­ (essential, if no biological cause) o Twice as frequent in Blacks. Known as the silent killer.  o Systolic­ ventricles contract, Diastolic­ resting o Many contributing factors  Weight reduction, salt intake reduction, exercise, smoking cessation,   Pharmaceutical intervention  Lower sympathetic nervous system arousal  Intensive relaxation/social­skills training  Anger management  Biofeedback  Stress and pain management • Genetic predisposition­   Rearing in social isolation  High level of emotional behavior  Sensitivity to salt  Easily angered (strong sex differences here, men)  Cardiovascular reactivity •  Coronary Heart Disease ­  o Angina pectoris­ periodic chest pains behind sternum. Usually  caused by insufficient supply of oxygen to the heart (ischemia),  which can be caused by atherosclerosis.  o Myocardial infarction­ leading cause of death in the US. Results in  permanent cardiac damage.   Factors­ age, sex, smoking, hypertension, high cholesterol,  big left ventricle, weight/inertia, alcohol, diabetes • Diatheses­ o Type A personality o Anger o Type D personality­ high scores on negative affectivity plus  inhibition in the expression of these emotions o Excessive changes in heart rate (reactivity) and variability  •  Asthma ­ whistling sounds (rales),  o Allergic­ respiratory cells are sensitive to allergens (inherited  hypersensitivity­ predisposed) o Ineffective­ bronchitis o Psychological­ anxiety, anger, depression and excitement  (emotional arousal)  Parent­child interaction­ high asthma rates among those  whose mothers had high levels of stress and whose families  were rated as having problems •  AIDS ­ can arise from behavior that is apparently irrational/self­defeating,  it is incurable, it can be prevented.  •  Other features of Health Psyc ­  o SES, Ethnicity, Gender Ch. 9: Eating Disorders Anorexia Nervosa: Refusal to maintain normal body weight (>85%), fear of fat, body  image disturvance, amenorrhea.  Restricting type­ severly limiting food intake Binge­Purge type­ regularly engagement in binging and purging (more  pathological) • Early to middle teens, life stess/dieting • Depression, OCD, phobia, panic disorder, alcoholism, personality disorder • For men: mood disorder, schizophrenia, substance dependence  • Shared diathesis with depression, though no known causal relationship has  been found • Genetic factors, relatives are at high risk o Biological consequences: low BP, low HR, kidney/gastro problems,  low bone mass, dry skin, brittle nails, hair loss, lanugo, anemia • Cognitive/Behavioral: behaviors that maintain thinness are negatively  reinforced by the reduction of anxiety about becoming fat. Dieting/weight loss  are negatively reinforced by sense of mastery/self­control. Social media  influence  Hospitalization, involuntary commitment, IV feeding  Immediate goal to gain weight, secondary goal to long term maintenance .  Family therapy is main treatment: reducing overinvolvement,  overprotectedness, rigidity and encourage conflict resolution.  o Changing the patient role of the patient o Redefining the eating problem as an interpersonal problem o Preventing the parents from using their child’s anorexia as a means of  avoiding conflict Bulimia Nervosa: repeated binge eating and purging (to prevent weight gain),  symptoms at least twice per week for at least 3 months, value shape and weight Non­Purging type­compensatory behaviors (fasting, excessive exercise) • Late adolescence, early adulthood, dieting • Depression, personality disorder (BPD), anxiety, substance abuse,  conduct disorder • For men: mood disorder, substance dependence.  • High suicide rate • Bulimia and depression are related (twin study) o Amenorrhea, normal BMI, potassium depletion, diarrhea,  electrolyte irregularities, irregular heart beat • Cognitive/Behavioral: Focus on weight/shape. Purging temporarily  reduces anxiety, but it lowers self­esteem (vicious cycle)  Antidepressants (Prozac)  Question society’s standards, reduce all­or­nothing thinking, meal  regularity, eating forbidden foods, identifying triggers,  Binge Eating Disorder: recurrent binges (two times per week for at least 6 months), lack  of control during binge, distress about binge, rapid eating, eating alone • Risk factors: childhood obesity, criticism, low self­concept, depression,  abuse • More prevalent than AN and BN • Genetic factors: relatives at greater risk Brain­ hypothalamus (lateral), cortisol levels Sociocultural­ white, upper SES diet frequently Cultural­ more common in US, Canada, Japan, Australia and Europe Family life­ high level of conflict Child abuse­ physical and sexual, higher rates, though these are retrospective accoutns • Psychodynamic: disturbed parent­child relationships, fulfill a need to be in  control of something or gain competence  • Personality: Starvation study Chapter 11: Schizophrenia Symptoms: no essential symptoms must be present for a diagnosis • Positive symptoms o Delusions­ beliefs held contrary to reality, highly implausible o Hallucinations­ sensory e
More Less

Related notes for PSY 3320

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit