Study Guides (248,252)
United States (123,303)
Biology (13)
BIO 250 (5)
Midterm

Exam 1 Notes

17 Pages
76 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biology
Course
BIO 250
Professor
Mason Meers
Semester
Fall

Description
1 Evolution and Morphology Anatomy and Evolution ● Evolution: Heritable change through time; Descent with modification ○ Early History: ■ Anaximander (610­546 BC) ■ Empedocles (490­430 BC) ■ Socrates (469­399 BC) ■ Plato (428­348 BC) ● Imaginary world and perfection ■ Aristotle (384­322 BC) ● Fixed and unchanging world ■ Herophilus (335­280 BC) ● First anatomist ● Invented deductive scientific method ■ Galen (2nd C. AD) ● “Father of Anatomy” (1500 years) ● Linnaeus/ Carl von Linne (1707­1778)­ “Father of Taxonomy” ● Comte de Buffon (1707­1788)­ Early advocate animals changing through time ● Paley, William Archdeacon of Carlisle (1743­1805)­ Argued that complexity indicates design and a designer (1802) ○ Precursor to “intelligent design” religious doctrine ● Cuvier, Baron Georges Leopold Chretien Frederic Dagobert (1769­1832)­ “Father of Paleontology”; Anti­evolutionist­ extinction ○ Catastrophism as an explanation of extinctions ○ Four “archetypes” from which all animals were built ● Hutton, James (1726­1797)­ Geological gradualism (uniformitarianism) ● Darwin, Erasmus (1731­1802)­ All living animals and plants were derived from microscopic forms ● Lamark, Jean Baptiste (1744­1829)­ Inheritance of acquired characteristics (use and disuse) ○ Robert Grant introduced Charles to Lamark’s ideas ● Geoffroy, Etienne St. Hilaire (1772­1844) ○ Colleague of Lamark noted that function isn't the determining factor for morphology­ rather phylogeny (birds have bird bones) ■ ...Battled Cuvier over archetype concept­ Owen settle it. ● Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von (1749­1832)­ Evolutionary changes ● Lyell, Sir Charles (1797­1875)­ Principles of Geology (1830) est. great age of the Earth Early Anatomical Work ● Galen (2nd C. AD) ○ Combined Aristotle’s philosophy with knowledge from dissections ○ Rome falls (5th C. AD) Galen’s teachings lost from Europe, but retained in the Middle East 2 ○ 1100’s (Dark Ages)­ Europeans rediscover Galen (translated from Arabic) ■ Develop new schools of medicine based on lecture and demonstration ● No dissection, no firsthand experience ● Edward Tyson (1650­1708),“Father of Modern Comparative Anatomy” ○ First comparative descriptions of anatomy (pre­evolutionary), gave rise to modern comparative anatomy ■ Showed porpoises to be mammals ■ Est. that chimps have more in common with humans than with monkeys (est. Hominoidea) The Dark Ages... ● Medicine reverts to leeches and maggots... ○ Sick integrated into society (not shunned) Leonardo Da Vinci (1452­1519) ● Made many anatomical drawings that were not published while he was alive ○ No contribution to science ● Some were human, others were non­humans labeled as humans and re­imagined Anatomy Reborn ● Pierre Belon (1517­1564) ○ Early comparative anatomist First Great Anatomical Works ● Andreas Vesalius (1514­1564) ○ Dissected humans extensively (executed criminals) ○ Showed that Galen had never dissected a human before ■ Researched non­humans for comparison ○ Changed thinking...direct observation importance Later Morphological Work ● Sir Richard Owen (1804­1892) ○ Systematization of anatomical terms ○ Development of broad ranging anatomical organizational concepts ● Theatrical dissections phased out ○ Medical education begins to include hands­on dissection ○ Increased cadaver demand ■ Private medical schools in Europe close ■ Decreased access to medicine Evolution and The Origin of the Species ● Species change through time ● Common descent ○ Diversification of multiple species from a common ancestor ○ Existing species evolved from earlier species ● Gradualness of evolution ● Natural Selection is the mechanism of evolution 3 Natural Selection ● Observation: Populations have the potential to increase exponentially ● Observation: Populations tend to remain stable ○ Conclusion: There is a struggle for survival ● Observation: Populations vary ● Observation: Variation is inherited ○ Conclusion: Survival in the struggle is not random, but depends, in part of inherited variations of the surviving individuals ○ Conclusion: Greater concentration of favorable traits and changes of population demographics will result from accumulation over generations Hypothesis Testing in Anatomy ● Documentation is not science ○ Natural history Analogy ● Analogous­ Characteristics that are similar due to convergent selection pressures ● Hypothesis of analogy are tested using phylogenies Homology ● Homologous­ Characteristic in two or more taxa that are similar in form due to inheritance from a common ancestor ● Hypothesis of homology are tested by many means Phylogenetic Systematics General... ● Dendrograms ○ Any diagram depicting a hypothesis of evolutionary relationships ■ Based on anything or nothing! ○ Some “testable”, others are not... ● Methods ○ Taxonomy­ Grouping by similarity ■ Evolutionary history may be irrelevant ○ Traditional Systematics­ Appeal to authority ○ Cladistics­ Uses homologies to differentiate relationships Grades vs. Clades ● Non­Evolutionary systematics mistook grades for clades ● What’s a grade? ○ A “level” of adaptation for a group ○ May be typical of many independently evolving lineages ○ “Reptiles” as a Grade ● What’s a Clade? ○ An independently evolving lineage 4 Phenetics ● Based on “overall similarity” ○ Intuitive ○ Animals that “look alike” are grouped together ○ Derived and primitive characteristics treated equally ■ Ignores homology Phylogenetic Problems ● Primitive Characters ○ Evolved prior to diversification of ingroup members (all may have it) ○ Not informative ● Shared­Derived Characters ○ Show relationships within the ingroup (only some have it) ○ Informative ● Automorphy = unique Hypotheses, Assumptions, and Theories ● All cladograms are hypotheses ○ Subject to “falsification” (rejection based on evidence) ● Theory: A hypothesis that’s been supported to such a degree that no serious workers in the field can foresee it being overturned at present. Vertebrate Paleontology Why Collect Fossils? ● George Gaylord Simpson calculated that more than 99% of all species that evolved are extinct ○ The vast majority of life that has ever evolved is gone! ○ Missing data can only be filled in by fossils Fossil and Fossilization ● Fossil: Any remains of an organism that have been buried by natural means ● Fossilization: The burying and sometimes mineralization of buried remains ○ Gradual accumulation of minerals within the bony structure or replacement of the bone with minerals ● Taphonomy: The processes of decay and subsequent disposition of dead animals ● Fossilization is extremely unlikely ○ Estimate chances at  <0.001% ● Appropriate Environment Required ○ Low­energy of transport ■ Avoid mechanical damage ○ Fine silt ○ Fast covering ○ Scavengers... Types of Fossilization ● Fossilization without alteration 5 ○ e.g., frozen Mammoths, insects in Amber ● Fossilization with alteration (most) ○ Replacement = Atom by atom replacement (petrified wood) ○ Permineralization = Minerals deposited in pores (fossilized bones) ○ Compression = Carbon residue left behind from soft part alteration ○ Mold = Fossil surrounded by hardened sediment is dissolved­­ leaving a cavity in the shape of the original fossil ○ Cast = Forms when the mold is filled with sediment (which then hardens) ● Trace Fossils­ Signs of the organisms ○ Footprints ○ Coprolites ○ Burrows The Importance of Fossils ● Bony anatomy of the fossil organism (soft­tissue on rare occasions) ○ e.g., Archaeopteryx ● Behavior What We Learn... ● Paleo­environment and climates in which organisms existed ● Paleo­ecology of ancient communities and rules affecting modern communities ● Biomaterials­ The development of commercial products that mimic the morphology or developmental structure of organics ● Larger extinct library than extant... ● Feeding habits ● Reproduction techniques ● Locomotion ● Predator­Prey interactions Functional Morphology in Paleobiology ● Form and Function ○ Muscle scars­ Clues to soft­tissue make­up ○ Phylogeny­ Inference of unpreserved homologies using extant species ● Biomechanics ○ Physics limited performance Biological Rules ● Selective pressures produce convergence ● Insular Dwarfism ● Cope’s Rule Basal Chordates And Their Origins Chordate Characters ● Important Primitive Characters ○ Coelom: Cavity in body ○ Enterocoelic coelom: Coelom formed within mesoderm via outpocketing of the 6 gut with subsequent closure ○ Deuterostomic body plan: Mouth and anus; Anus develops from blastopore ○ Primitively holoblastic (even), radial cleavage (offset cell borders) ○ Bilateral symmetry ○ Segmented Chordate Synapomorphies ● Pharyngeal Slits ● Notochord ● Post­Anal Tail ● Dorsal­Hollow Nerve Cord ● Endostyle Hemichordates ● Invaginated Dorsal Nerve Cord ○ Not hollow in most species! ● No Post­Anal Tail or Notochord ● Larval forms similar to echinoderm ○ Ciliated surface, simple gut, plankton ● Enteropneusta­ “Acorn Worms” ○ Shallow marine environments ○ Burrowing substrate feeders or suspension feeders ○ Possess a glomerulus: A rudimentary kidney­like structure for excretion ● Pterobranchia ○ Deep ocean dwellers­ live in secretion tubes ○ Colonial suspension feeders ○ Glomerulus Urochordates ● The most primitive chordates... ● Suspension feeders ● Specialized pharynx (branchial basket) in some... ● All marine ● Ascidiacea­ “Sea Squirts” ○ Planktonic larvae, sessile adults ○ Larvae surrounded by acellular tunic ○ Metamorphosis present ○ Notochord, Dorsal Hollow Nerve cord, and tail resorbed! ○ Sexual and asexual reproduction Larvacea­ Formerly Appendicularia ● Marine, planktonic animals ● Produces a gelatinous “house” in which it lives and feeds ● Tail creates moving water current ● Secreted by the epithelium ● Almost all are monecious 7 ● Most are protandrous­ sperm and eggs produced in same gonad Cephalochordates ● Planktonic larvae ● Adults are motile, but usually live submerged ● Muscles between segments of fluid­filled notochord ○ Stiffens cord for borrowing or increased swimming rate (or both) ● Suspension feeders ○ Ciliated food channels line the pharynx ■ Endostyle ■ Epibranchial groove ○ Oral hood supports food­processing equipment ■ Buccal cirri­ strainers ■ Tracks of cilia (wheel organ) ● Divided pharyngeal slits (into two each) ● Hatschek’s pit invaginated pit at root of buccal cavity ○ May be homologous to the vertebrate Pituitary Gland ● Water is funneled through pharyngeal slits (which are enclosed within the body wall) to the “atrium” and then out via the atriopore (caudally) ● Digestive System­ Very similar to vertebrates! ○ Collects iodine­ As does the vertebrate thyroid ○ Midgut cecum­ May be precursor to liver based on arterial homologies and pancreas based on secretions ● Blood­ Similar to Vertebrates! ○ Flow patterns, blood vessels, etc ○ No heart ■ Pharyngeal Arch Complex = substitute ● Excretory System (e.g., Kidneys) ○ Cells similar to vertebrates kidney cells, but functionally similar to invertebrates Hypotheses of Evolutionary Origins ● Chordates from Annelids ○ Evidence for... ■ Shared basic body plan (just upside down!) ○ Evidence against... ■ Exoskeleton very different from endoskeleton ■ Segmentation details different ■ Upside­down theory flawed in details of anatomy ■ Solid nerve cords in annelids and arthropods, etc ■ Embryology different in the two groups ● Chordates from Echinoderms ○ Evidence for... ■ Both deuterostomes ■ Cleavage same ■ Mesodermal coelom formation same 8 ■ Bilateral symmetry in echinoderm larvae ■ Hemichordate larval similarities and their subsequent relationship to vertebrates ■ Needed Selection or Processes... ● Selection for different locomotor and feeding systems ○ Problem of size ● Loss of adult stage or metamorphosis ○ Paedomorphosis­ The attainment of sexual maturity in a juvenile form (hence loss of the “adult” stage) ○ Evidence/Arguments Against... ■ Living “protochordates” are their own, distinct organisms ■ The tunicate intestine is not homologous to the chordate intestine ■ Tail musculature in Ascidians is non­segmental so not homologous Earliest Known Chordates ●
More Less

Related notes for BIO 250

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit