Get 2 days of unlimited access
Textbook Notes (270,000)
AUS (2,000)
MQ (80)
Chapter 4

PSYC105 Chapter Notes - Chapter 4: Color Blindness, Basilar Membrane, Visual Cortex


Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSYC105
Professor
Alissa Beath
Chapter
4

This preview shows half of the first page. to view the full 3 pages of the document.
PSYC105
REVEL
WEEK 9 & 10 CHAPTER 4
TWO SIDES OF THE COIN: SENSATION AND PERCEPTION
4.1 Identify the basic principles that apply to all senses
Transduction = Process of converting an external energy, such as light or sound vibration, into
electrical activity within neurons
The doctrine of specific nerve energies - how each of the sensory modalities is handled by
specific regions of the brain
Most connections in the brain are faithful to one sense modality, brain regions often respond to
information from a different sense
SEEING: THE VISUAL SYSTEM
4.2 Explain how the eye starts the visual process
The lens in the eye accommodates to focus on images both near and far by changing from ‘fat’
to ‘flat’
Optimally focuses light on the retina - lies at the rear of the eye
Retina contains rods and cones filled with pigments
Additional cells in the retina transmit information about light to ganglion cells
The axons of these cells combine to form the optic nerve
4.3 Identify the different kinds of visual perception
Our visual system is sensitive to shape and colour
Use different parts of the visual cortex to process these different aspects of visual perception
V1 cells are sensitive to lines of a particular orientation
Colour perception involves a mixture of trichromatic and opponent processing.
4.4 Describe different visual problems
Blindness is a worldwide problem, especially in underdeveloped countries
Several types of colour blindness - most common being redgreen
The phenomenon of blind-sight demonstrates that some blind people can make better-than-
chance ‘guesses’ about the location of objects in their environments
HEARING: THE AUDITORY SYSTEM
4.5 Explain how the ear starts the auditory process
Sound waves created by vibration of air molecules are funnelled into the outer ear
These vibrations perturb the eardrum, causing the three small bones in the middle ear to vibrate
Creates pressure in the cochlea, which contains the basilar membrane and the organ of Corti, in
which hair cells are embedded
The hair cells then bend, thereby exciting them. The message is relayed through the auditory
nerve
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version