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Chapter 5, 6

LING 3P97 Chapter Notes - Chapter 5, 6: Conductive Hearing Loss, Sensorineural Hearing Loss, Hearing Aid


Department
Linguistics
Course Code
LING 3P97
Professor
Barbra Zupan
Chapter
5, 6

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LING 3P97 Chapter 5: Audiogram interpretation
Audiogram: patients pure tone thresholds are recorded on this graph
Decibels of hearing level: (dB HL) decibel scale in which the reference value is the
minimum SPL standards for normal hearing as a function of frequency, where 0dB
HL at any frequency represents the lowest level for normal hearing
Reference equivalent threshold dB SPL: reference levels for pure tones and speech,
that correspond to the average normal thresholds; calibration values used for
audiometers for dB hearing level, the most recent of which should appear on the y
axis of an audiogram
Reference equivalent threshold dB force level: ?
Unmasked: without noise presented in the non test ear
Masked: with noise presented in the non test ear
Clinical masking: process of putting noise into the non test ear (NTE) while
measuring thresholds in the test ear
Masker: noise presented in the NTE
Masked thresholds: pure tone thresholds obtained in the TE
*
When describing pure tone audiogram, the following 3 types of info should be
conveyed
:
-degree/amount of hearing loss;
-type of hearing loss;
-shape of hearing loss
Type of hearing loss: one of the parameters used in describing audiograms; type of
loss can be either conductive, sensorineural, or mixed for any frequency
Sensorineural hearing loss: Air bone gap equal or less than 10dB
Conductive hearing loss: Air bone gap over 10dB; Bone conduction equal or less
than 25dB HL
Mixed hearing loss: Air bone gap over 10dB; Bone conduction over 25dB HL
Shape of hearing loss: one of the parameters used in describing audiograms; refers
to the amount of con7guration of the thresholds across frequency (ex. sloping, 9at,
notched, rising)
Bilateral: results similar in both ears
Relatively 9at: within 20dB across audiogram
Sloping: over 20dB per octave toward high freqs
Precipitous: steeply sloping (Ex. over 40dB an octave)
Rising: improving from low to high freqs
Notched: worse in a narrow region (typically 3-6kHz)
Corner: residual hearing only in the lower freqs
Unilateral: hearing loss in one ear
Asymmetric: signi7cant di=erence in the hearing loss between the 2 ears
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