Textbook Notes (367,832)
Canada (161,442)
Business (358)
BUSI 2101 (37)
Chapter 8

Lecture_4-Chapter_8-InterpersonalCommunication.pdf

7 Pages
126 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Business
Course
BUSI 2101
Professor
David Cray
Semester
Fall

Description
ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR: AN EXPERIENTIAL APPROACH EIGHTH EDITION  Joyce S. Osland  PART 2 CREATING EFFECTIVE WORK GROUPS    Chapter 8 ­ Interpersonal Communication OBJECTIVES: A. Understand the transactional model of communication. 1.  Communication is a major portion of a manager's job and an essential skill for anyone working in business. 2.  Communication is the process by which information is exchanged between communicators  with the goal of achieving mutual understanding. 3.  The transactional model of communication consists of two communicators who participate  equally from their own personal context or field of experience. To communicate, they must  find a shared field of experience. Over time, the nature of their communication may change as well as their fields of experience. Noise can interfere with their intended communication. B. List common sources of distortion in communication. 4.  The arc of distortion is the difference between what the sender intended to communicate and  what the receiver understood the message to be. 5.  There is much potential for distortion in the communication process.  Therefore, it's best to assume that any communication can also involve a partial misunderstanding. Active listening, requests clarification, and checking meaning with feedback are ways to ensure that the message received is the intended message. 6.  Potential barriers to communication include: poor relationships, lack of clarity, individual difference in encoding and decoding, gender differences, perceptions, culture, misinterpretation of nonverbal communication, defensiveness, lack of feedback and clarification, and poor listening skills. 7.  Meaning lies in people, not in words. 8.  The most effective communicators are receiver­oriented because they take the perspective of the receivers and customize messages for them.   C. Identify gender differences in communication. 9.  Men and women communicate in different ways, primarily because of socialization and status.   D. Identify cultural differences in communication. 10.  Common style differences in intercultural communication are: high­context versus low­context, direct versus indirect, and self­enhancement versus self­effacement. Cultures also use and interpret silence and nonverbal gestures in different ways. 11.  More meaning is taken from (1) facial expressions and posture and (2) vocal intonation and inflection than from words themselves.   E. Describe and identify the five response styles. 14.  Five common response styles are: evaluative, interpretive, supportive, probing, and understanding These styles also contain a mesage about the relationship between the two parties.  Only the understanding response reflects an egalitarian stance rather than a one­up position.   F. Explain how to create a climate that encourages nondefensive communication. 12.  Defensiveness is a common barrier to communication because the energy devoted to defending oneself prevents attention to the message. 13.   A non­defensive climate is created when people are descriptive, egalitarian focused on problem solving, spontaneous, empathic, and provisional. G. Recognize assertive communication and utilize I­statements. 15.  Assertiveness is the ability to communicate clearly and directly what you need or want from another person in a way that does not deny or infringe upon the other's rights. 16. I­statements (behavior, effects, feelings) are an effective way to provide feedback to others. 17. Communication channels can be rich (multiple channels) or lean (limited channels). H. Improve your active listening skills 18. The components of active listening are: a. Being nonevaluative b. Paraphrasing the content c. Reflecting implications d. Reflecting underlying feelings e. Inviting further contributions f. Using nonverbal listening responses   COMMUNICATION MISTAKES ONLY REALLY SMART PEOPLE MAKE ­  Smart people are sometimes jerks because, if they are task oriented and have been rewarded only for measured success with computers, budgets, and other inanimate objects, they might ignore or even disparage the "soft" skills, such as negotiation, conflict management and delegation. But, even if you are currently successful at building productive relationships, a change in your personal or professional situation can also change your behavior for the worse. ­  Three Communication Mistakes ­  Keeping in the best performance state ­ The first key to maintaining and improving excellent communication is to take your physical and emotional health seriously. ­  The wrong professional attitude ­  Sometimes an ineffective communication style is the result of years of conditioning, where someone believes that being smart is the only measure of success, usually because he or she was rewarded for succeeding at taking tests. This person thinks that all rank, authority, influence, and privilege in the workplace should be measured by "smart." ­  The clueless factor ­  The most difficult flaw to self­diagnose and self­correct in the smart person is the conviction that one's failings are actually virtues. KNOWLEDGE BASE communication (defined) ­ the process by which information is exchanged between communicators with the goal of achieving mutual understanding.   The communication model EXHIBIT ­ Transactional Model of Communication Person A speaks, he or she is also "listening" and receiving a message from Person B. This is called a transactional model because it acknowledges that our responses to speakers' messages lead them to modify what they say next. Furthermore, the different time periods reflect the changing nature of communication over time, depending on what transpires between people. Our individual backgrounds and personality cause us to encode and decode messages in a unique fashion. This makes mutual understanding more challenging and explains why the two communicators must find a shared field of experience (e.g., shared town, culture, organization, views). noise (defined) ­ anything that interferes with the intended communication. There are three types of noise that prevent effective listening: (1) environmental (e.g., hot rooms, lawnmowers, etc.), (2) physiological (e.g., headaches or hunger pangs), and (3) emotional (e.g., worry, fear, anxiety). arc of distortion is the difference between what the sender intended to communicate and what the receiver actually understood.    BARRIERS TO COMMUNICATION 1 ­  Poor Relationships. 2 ­  Lack of Clarity. 3 ­  Individual Differences in Encoding and Decoding. 4 ­  Perception. 5 ­  Culture. 6 ­  Misinterpretation of Nonverbal Communication. 7 ­  Defensiveness. 8 ­  Lack of Feedback and Clarification. 9 ­  Poor Listening Skills. 1 ­ Poor Relationships. (Barrier to Communication) ­  Communications must be understood within the context of the interpersonal relationship. If two people have been involved in an ongoing, bitter argument over a business decision, it will be more difficult for them to hear the other's messages without distortion. 2 ­ Lack of Clarity. (Barrier to Communication) ­  The way Person A encodes the message may not accurately reflect the message they want to transmit. Failure to consider how one's audience will perceive the message can result in unclear messages. Ambiguous language causes confusion, and jargon is incomprehensible to outsiders. 3 ­ Individual Differences in Encoding and Decoding. (Barrier to Communication) ­  The way Person A encodes messages and the way Person B decodes them is strongly related to their indiv
More Less

Related notes for BUSI 2101

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit