Textbook Notes (368,966)
Canada (162,317)
Economics (280)
ECON 1000 (181)
Chapter 5

Chapter 5.docx

3 Pages
187 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Economics
Course
ECON 1000
Professor
Paul Haddow
Semester
Fall

Description
Elasticity and it’s Application The Elasticity of Demand Elasticity: a measure of the responsiveness of quantity demanded or quantity supplied to one of its  determinants. The Price Elasticity of Demand and Its Determinants: Price Elasticity of Demand: a measure of how much the quantity demanded of a good responds to  a change in the price of that good, computed as the percentage change in quantity demanded  divided by the percentage change in price. ­ Elastic good: if the quantity demanded responds substantially to changes in the price. ­ Inelastic good: if the quantity demanded responds only slightly to changes in price. Factors That Effect Elasticity: Availability of Close Substitutes:  Goods with a close substitute are more elastic, because if the price rises in one good consumers  will quickly switch to the other good, dramatically dropping the demand for the first good. Necessities versus Luxuries:  ­ Necessities have inelastic demands (the price of toothpaste rises, the demand does not change  too much) ­ Luxuries have elastic demands (the price of sailboats rise, people will stop buying sailboats) Definition of the Market:  ­ Narrowly defined markets are more elastic, easier to find substitutes (ice cream market has many  substitutes) ­ Widely defined markets are inelastic, harder to find substitutes (the food market as a whole cannot  be substituted) Time Horizon: ­ Goods have a more elastic demand over a longer period of time (as gas prices rise, in the first few  months people slightly reduce there gas intake, over years they buy more fuel efficient cars etc.  which significantly reduces the demand for gas) Computing the Price Elasticity of Demand Price elasticity of demand = Percentage change in quantity demanded                                                   Percentage change in price The Midpoint Method Price elasticity of demand = (Q2­Q1)/(Q2+Q1)/2                                           (P2­P1)/(P2+P1)/2                                               = end value – start value                                                  midpoint The Variety of Demand Curves Inelastic: when the elasticity is less than 1 Elastic: when the elasticity is greater than 1 Unit Elasticity: when the elasticity is 1 ­ The flatter the demand curve that passes through a given point, the greater the price elasticity of  demand. ­ The steeper the demand curve that passes through a given point, the smaller the price elasticity  of demand.
More Less

Related notes for ECON 1000

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit