Textbook Notes (367,757)
Canada (161,373)
Psychology (661)
PSYC 3402 (29)
Chapter 5

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Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 3402
Professor
Ralph Serin
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 5 Summary Developmental Issues Juvenile OffendingChildren under the age of 12 may not be charged with an offense even if they commit violent acts such as murderChildrens behaviour in this age category is governed by the Child and Family Services ActYouth between the ages of 12 and 18 may be charged but it is understood that this age category have other developmental needsProvisions for offenders of this age category are outlined in the Youth Criminal Justice ActHistory of Juvenile Justice in Canada Key TermsDiversionis a decision not to prosecute a young offender but rather have them undergo an educational or community service program Extrajudicial MeasuresCommunity options and less serious alternatives than youth court Juvenile Delinquents ActIn 1908 Canada enacted the Juvenile Delinquents actApplied to persons between the ages of 7 and 16Sanctions included fines probation mandatory attendance in an industrial school to learn a trade and foster careCriticism of the JDA included the informality of youth court denial of rights and representation denial of appeal open ended sentences and the broad definition of delinquencyParents encouraged to participate Young Offenders ActApplied to persons from 7 years old to 12 and up to 18In order to be transferred to adult court you must be at least 14 YOA allows young offenders to be diverted and subjected to penalties such as an absolute discharge fines compensation for loss or damaged property restitution prohibition order community service probation or secure custody Custody can be a community residential facility group home childcare or prisonYOA was amended several timesBill C106 section 16 was introduced to combat the problem of juveniles pleading guilty to avoid transfer to adult courtBill C37 changed section 16 again to say that 16 and 17 year olds could be tried in adult court if they were charged with murder manslaughter or aggravated sexual assaultYouth Criminal Justice ActReplaced the YOA in 2003Objectives are to prevent youth crime provide meaningful consequences and encourage responsibility of behaviour as well as to improve rehabilitation and reintegration of youth into communityAdult sentence cannot be applied unless the crown informs the court that it will be seeking an adult sentence
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