Textbook Notes (368,164)
Canada (161,688)
Sociology (164)
SOCI 1001 (18)
Chapter 2

Chapter 2 Notes

2 Pages
100 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOCI 1001
Professor
Tamy Superle
Semester
Fall

Description
Readings: Haenfler “Chapter 2: Skinheads ­ The Symbolism of Style & Ritual,” pp. 17­29.  ­ often, our image of subculturalists rests upon stereotypes, oversimplified generalizations applied to all members of a group.  Stereotypes are often based on distorted facts, half­truths, and even outright lies Origins of Skinhead Roots of Skinhead Culture ­ Rude Boys and Mods ­ subcultures often evolve into new forms, adopting fresh styles and changing to fit different times and places ­ skinhead lineage begins with the Teddy Boys, fashionable British youth who sported  "Edwardian coats, tight pants, and very  short hair styles". They enjoyed drinking and  dancing to the newly popular rock and roll, and their style appropriated a  wealthy  facade which contradicted their working class roots ­After the Teds came the Mods and the Rockers ­Mods rode scooters (usually Vespas), wore trendy clothing, frequented dance clubs,  and listened to bands such  as The Who and The Kinks, embracing the future even as  they struggled against the constraints of their mostly working class  backgrounds ­ Rockers, riding motorcycles in their leather jackets, fought their rival Mods for  territory, symbolizing for Mods a  clinging to the past. ­ Eventually the "hard mods" who were more working class than their counterparts,  became the skinheads ­roots of skinhead culture can be traced to people of colour, especially black Jamaican immigrants to the UK ­British youth fused the Ted and Mod styles with the Jamaican "Rude Boy" culture ­ Rude Boys were a 1960's Jamaican subculture of youth trying to get by in the poverty and unemployment of the post­ independence era. Frustrated by a declining economy and disappointed by the lack of expected improvements after the British  departure, many youths turned to crime and violence Working Class English Skins ­ while the teds and the mods tended to emulate upper class fashions and lifestyles, temporarily escaping their workday lives,  skinheads celebrated their working class roots. ­ wore denim jeans, work boots, white tank top, suspenders, flight jackets, and Fred Perry polo shirts or Ben Sherman button  ups. Also shaved heads, hence skinheads. ­ avid football (soccer) supporters ­ female skinheads, called Chelseas, have shaved heads but retain bangs or a "fringe" of hair. Fashion includes bleached hair,  plaid/checkers skirts, and flight jackets and denim jeans Social Class Structural Context and Subcultural Emergence ­ structural context: the historical, social, political, cultural, and economic circumstances in a society that influence  subcultures emergence and form.  The " big picture" in which subcultures exist  ­ social class designates ones economic standing in a society and therefore many of ones opportunities ­ symbolic resistance: the theory that, say rather than being truly revolutionary in making actual political change,  subcultures all for symbolic challenges to society that in reality produced little social change ­ hegemony: the dominance of one group over another.  Typically associated with the powerful wealthy classes and nations  exercising political and cultural domination over the rest of society in order to keep their power ­ blocked structural opportunities: the theory that youth join deviant groups due to inadequate legitimate access to  society's rewards, including wealth and prestige, as well as decent jobs, Health Care, and luxury goods  Core Values ­ though skinheads hold diverse ideologies, they tend to accept several core values related in one way or another to social class.   First and foremost, skinheads express working class pride.  The value common sense, hard work, camaraderie, and worker unity,  distinguishing themselves from intellectuals and managers who they consider spoiled, lazy, or effeminate ­ pride is a general skinhead theme, but their pride in one's self, friends, f
More Less

Related notes for SOCI 1001

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit