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SOCI 1001 (18)
Chapter 7

Chapter 7 Notes

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Department
Sociology
Course
SOCI 1001
Professor
Tamy Superle
Semester
Fall

Description
Haenfler “Chapter 7: Goth–Stigma and Stigma Management,” pp. 91­103. Introducing Goth ­ new subcultures usually do not pop up out of nowhere, they often emerge from the ashes of the old, recycling some aspects of  previous scenes and replacing others. ­ Goth emerged in the early 1980s in Britain from what was left of the original punk. ­ performers such as David Bowie, Joy Division, and Siouxsie and the Banshees provided early inspiration for what would  become goth­themed music. ­ the goth­scene gained in popularity until the mid 1990s, but eventually popular interest declined. ­ Goth's distinguishing feature is its focus on death and the macabre ­ Goth's push no political agenda, insisting only on respect for individuality and a tolerance for diversity, and they claim no single  religious affiliation, with some being completely secular and others pursue various spiritual paths. ­ Goths are perhaps most known for the dark, grim style characterized by black clothing, black hair, black eyeliner, and pretty  much black everything ­ a stigma is a discrediting attribute or mark of disgrace that leads others to see us as untrustworthy, incompetent, or tainted.   State laws can change our entire self concept and identity. ­Erving Goffman identified three main categories of stigma: physical disfigurement is (such as missing an ear), individual  character flaws (like drug addiction), and membership in a "tainted" group (for example, based upon race, religion, or ethnicity) ­ for Goffman, people with a stigmatized identity are either "the discreditable" or "the discredited".  The discreditable  include people with deviant characteristics theye are able to hide (such as sexual fetishists).  The discredited have either been  revealed or unable to conceal their stigma (such as people who use a wheelchair). ­ culture of fear: a society in which people worry about a variety of social problems fueled by the media
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