Textbook Notes (368,795)
Canada (162,165)
Physiology (40)
PHYL 1010X (23)
n/a (23)
Chapter

Block C - Cardiovascular Physiology Blood Vessels.docx

5 Pages
130 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Physiology
Course
PHYL 1010X
Professor
n/a
Semester
Winter

Description
Module IX The Vessels INTRODUCTION: In Unit 2, you learned how the heart contracts, and pressure­ejects blood into the aorta during each  cardiac cycle. In this unit, you will learn how the pressure imparted to the blood in the arterial system changes  with time during each cycle. You will also learn how the pressure is dissipated at various points along the way  back to the great veins and the right atrium. There is very little pressure loss from the aorta to the ends of the arteries. That is just as well, because it  ensures that mean blood pressure is the same (about 90 mm Hg) at the entry point to each organ (see Figure M9­ 1 of Module Introduction). Since blood pressure is also nearly the same (though very much reduced) at the exit  point of each organ, the largest pressure drop occurs within the organs/tissues. In fact, it occurs between the  entry and exit regions of the arterioles. The high resistance to flow offered by the arterioles and capillaries slows blood velocity down to a  crawl. In the smallest capillaries, red blood cells barely fit through the narrowest points of the vessels. The slow  movement allows ample time for the exchange of gases, nutrients, and fluid between the blood and the  interstitial fluid bathing the tissue cells. You will also learn about the veins, and the factors that promote the  return of venous blood to the right atrium. In the section on fluid exchange across the capillary walls, you will be informed that more fluid enters  the interstitial spaces from the capillaries, than returns back again. If there were not a way to redress this  situation, blood volume would continuously go down, and interstitial space would continuously expand. That  this does not happen under normal conditions is due to the functioning of the lymphatic system. This system is  discussed at the end of the unit. THE VESSELS (OVERVIEW): • Inner lining of ALL blood vessels is a thin layer of endothelium • Arteries, arterioles & veins contain vascular smooth muscle o Capable of vasoconstriction & vasodilation – but maintain a state of partial contraction at all  times (muscle tone)                                         Mean       Mean Wall                      Compositio ition Diameter Thickness n ARTERY Blood vessels that carry blood AWAY  4.0 mm 1.0 mm Endothelium (10%) from the heart Elastic Tissue (30%) Smooth Muscle (40%) Fibrous Tissue (20%) ARTERIOL Smallest artery & site of variable  30.0 μm 6.0 μm Endothelium (25%) E resistance in the circulatory system Smooth Muscle (75%) CAPILLARY Smallest blood vessel where blood  8.0 μm 0.5 μm Endothelium (100%) exchanges material with the  interstitial fluid VENULE Smallest vessels in the venous  20.0 μm 1.0 μm Endothelium (33%) circulation Fibrous Tissue (67%) 1 Module IX The Vessels VEIN Blood vessels that RETURN blood to  5.0 mm 0.5 mm Endothelium (22%) the heart Elastic Tissue (11%) Smooth Muscle (35%) Fibrous Tissue (22%) STRUCTURE & FUNCTION: The branching of arteries into narrow arterioles results in high resistance to blood flow through the narrow  arteriolar vessels Structure Function Arteries Walls both stiff & springy Allows them to absorb energy & release it  through elastic recoil (Thick smooth muscle layer + elastic & fibrous CT) Diverge into progressively smaller arteries Divergent pattern of blood flow Arterioles Diverge into progressively smaller arterioles Divergent pattern of blood flow Less elastic & more smooth muscle than arteries  Contract & relax according to various  (Continuous smooth muscle layer) chemical signals Capillaries Endothelium layer only Facilitate exchange of materials Surrounded by pericytes Contribute to capillary permeability (More pericytes, less leaky) ARTERIAL BLOOD PRESSURE: • Highest in arteries & lowest in veins o Decreases continuously as blood flows through the circulatory system o E is lost as a result of the resistance to flow offered by the blood vessels Systolic Pressure • Highest pressures in the circulatory system reflect the pressures created by  contraction of the ventricles • 120 mmHg during ventricular systole in arteries Diastolic Pressure • Lowest pressure in the circulatory system associated with the relaxation of  the ventricles • 80 mmHg during ventricular diastole Pulse Pressure • The strength of the pulse wave o Pulse is a pressure wave that is transmitted through the fluid of the  CV system • Pulse Pressure = Systolic Pressure – Diastolic Pressure Mean Pressure (MAP) • Average blood pressure in the arteries 2 Module IX The Vessels • MAP = Diastolic P + 1/3 (Systolic P – Diastolic P) MAP is Determined By: • Blood volume o Fluid intake & fluid loss • Effectiveness of the heart as a pump (cardiac output) o Heart rate & stroke volume •
More Less

Related notes for PHYL 1010X

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit