Textbook Notes (369,205)
Canada (162,462)
Physiology (40)
PHYL 1010X (23)
n/a (23)
Chapter

Block B - Endocrine Physiology Hormones.docx

3 Pages
176 Views

Department
Physiology
Course Code
PHYL 1010X
Professor
n/a

This preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full 3 pages of the document.
Description
Module V Hormones INTRODUCTION: The endocrine system encompasses a variety of glands that are widely distributed throughout the body.  These glands produce an array of hormones that have many different functions. You have already learned in  Module 4 that hormones are blood­borne chemical messengers that move from the endocrine glands where they  are produced, to the target cells (or effector cells) upon which they act. In this module, you will study the basic  structure and function of the hormones secreted by the endocrine glands. We will also discuss how the hormones  are transported in the blood, their metabolism and excretion, and the mechanisms of hormone action. Endocrinology: The study of hormones. Hormone: A chemical secreted by a cell or group of cells into the blood for transport to a distant  target, where it exerts its effect at very low concentrations. Mechanism of Action: How the hormone binds to the target cell receptor to initiate a biochemical response. What Makes a Chemical a Hormone? • Secreted by a cell or group of cells • Secreted into the blood • Transported to a distant target • Exert their effect at very low concentrations • Act by binding to receptor (cellular mechanism of action) • Action must be terminated (broken down by enzymes according to half­life) This unit begins with an ANATOMY SUMMARY of Hormones in Figure 7­2. Here you will find a listing of  the endocrine glands, the hormones they secrete, and the major functions that each hormone controls. This  figure is for reference and orientation only. You may want to refer to this table from time to time throughout the  remainder of the course. As you look at this table, note the variety of functions that the hormones control. Note  also that organs such as the heart and kidneys have endocrine cells that can produce hormones. Although there are many different hormones with different functions, the hormones can be grouped into  three major chemical classes ­ peptides, steroids, and amines. Table 7­1 is an excellent comparison. You should  carefully study this table. 3 Chemical Classes of Hormones: • Peptide/protein hormones, steroid hormones & AA­derived hormones o Peptide/protein are composed of linked AA o Steroid hormones are all derived from cholesterol o AA­derived hormones are modification of single AA (either tryptophan or tyrosine) • If a hormone is not a steroid hormone or AA­derivative, it must be a peptide or protein The peptide hormones are secreted from secretory vesicles by exocytosis as depicted in Figure 7­3. They  dissolve in the plasma, and are therefore quickly cleared from the circulation by the liver and kidneys. The  receptors for these hormones are located on the cell membranes of the target tissue as seen in Figure 7­5. By contrast, the steroid hormones can cross the hydrophobic plasma membrane by diffusion. They are  poorly soluble in plasma and circulate in the blood mainly bound to specific binding proteins. A small amount  1 Module V Hormones can dissolve in the plasma, and this "free" amount is in equilibrium with bound hormones. Therefore, changes in  binding protein concentration can affect the level of free hormones. Free hormone molecules are the only ones  that are bioactive; they can cross the cell membrane and enter the cytoplasm of target cells. The receptors for  these hormones are located mainly on the inside of the target cell, usually in the nucleus. Figure 7­7 shows a  steroid hormone in action. Steroid hormones generally survive longer than peptide hormones before being  metabolized or excreted. The amine hormones can be divided into the catecholamines, which function much like the peptide  hormones and thyroid hormone, whose action more closely resembles that of steroid hormones.
More Less
Unlock Document

Only page 1 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit