Textbook Notes (367,758)
Canada (161,374)
Physiology (40)
PHYL 1010X (23)
n/a (23)
Chapter

Block B - Smooth and Cardiac Muscle.docx

4 Pages
144 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Physiology
Course
PHYL 1010X
Professor
n/a
Semester
Summer

Description
Module VII Smooth & Cardiac Muscle INTRODUCTION: Smooth muscle is found throughout the body, including the uterus, gastrointestinal tract, bladder, lung  airways, and blood vessel walls. In general, smooth muscle around "hollow" organs regulates the movement of  materials inside the organ (e.g. food in the stomach, blood in the arteries). Smooth muscle cells differ from  striated muscle cells in structure, organization of the myofilaments, electrical activity, and contractile  responsiveness to nerve and hormonal signals. Cardiac muscle is a specialized muscle found only in the heart. Cardiac muscle has similarities with both  skeletal and smooth muscle. Similarities and differences are described in this unit. A more detailed study of  cardiac muscle is saved for Module 9. Smooth muscle tissue is not normally under direct voluntary control. There are two types of smooth  muscle tissue: (1) single­unit smooth muscle (or visceral smooth muscle) and (2) multi­unit smooth muscle.  Single­unit smooth muscle is the more common type and is found in the walls of small arteries and veins, the  stomach, intestines, uterus and urinary bladder. Multi­unit smooth muscle is found in the walls of the large  arteries, in the airways leading to the lungs, in the muscles of the iris, in the ciliary body of the eye and attached  to the hairs in the skin. SINGLE UNIT & MULTI­UNIT SMOOTH MUSCLE: • Smooth muscle compose of small, spindle shaped cells with a single nucleus o Unlike large multi­nucleated fibers of skeletal muscles • NT diffuses across the cell surface until it finds a receptor o No specialized receptor region (motor end plates) like in skeletal muscle synapses Single­Unit Smooth Muscle (Visceral) Cells Multi­Unit Smooth Muscle Cells Connected by gap junctions Not electrically linked Electrically linked (AP in one spreads through gap  Each cell must be stimulated independently by axon  junctions to contract entire tissue) terminal or varicosity Cells contract as a single unit (no reserve units left foCells contract individually (increasing force of  recruitment) contraction requires recruitment) Amount Ca  entering cell = Force of contraction Found in iris & ciliary body of the eye, male  reproductive tract & uterus just prior to labor/delivery Found in visceral tissue (internal organs) such as  blood vessels & intestinal tract MYOFILAMENT ORGANIZATION: • Actin and myosin are loosely arranged around the periphery of the cell o Held in place by protein dense bodies • Arrangement of fibers causes cell to become globular when it contracts o Actin & myosin are arranged in long bundles that extend diagonally around cell periphery,  forming lattice around central nucleus • Myosin can slide along actin for long distances without encountering the end of a sarcomere o Enable smooth muscle to stretch more while still maintaining optimal tension • Smooth muscle myosin has hinged heads all along its length 1 Module VII Smooth & Cardiac Muscle Smooth Muscle Skeletal Muscle Not arranged in sarcomeres or striated Arranged in sarcomeres and striated Actin & myosin arranged in long bundles Actin & myosin arranged in sarcomeres Forms lattice around central nucleus Forms distinct striated patters Becomes globular with contraction Shortens with contraction Entire myosin filament covered in myosin heads Centre of myosin filament lacks myosin heads SMOOTH MUSCLE CONTRACTION: 2+ 1. Increase in cytosolic Ca  initiates contraction i. Ca  is released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum & also enters from the ECF 2. Ca  binds to calmodulin (CaM), a binding protein found in the cytosol 2+ 3. Ca  binding to CaM is the first step in a cascade that ends in phosphorylation of myosin i. Ca  ­ CaM activate myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) 4. Phosphorylation of myosin enhances myosin ATPase activity i. MLCK phosphorylates light chains in myosin heads & increases myosin ATPase activity 5. Active myosin cross bridges slide along actin & create muscle tension i. Results in contraction Smooth Muscle Contraction Skeletal Muscle Contraction Ca  initiates contraction Ca  comes from sarcoplasmic reticulum & ECF Ca  comes from sarcoplasmic reticulum 2+ Action potential not a requirement for Ca  release Always preceded by an action potential 2+ No troponin, Ca  initiates cascade that ends with  Acts on troponin to initiate contraction phosphorylation of myosin SMOOTH MUSCLE RE2+XATION: 2+ 1. Free Ca  in cytosol decreases when Ca  is pumped out of the cell or back into the sarcoplasmic  reticulum 2. Ca  unbinds from CaM 3. Myosin phosphatase removes phosphate from myosin i. Decreases myosin ATPase activity 4. Less myosin ATPase results in decreased muscle tension Latch State: • Smooth muscle condition in which dephosphoryl
More Less

Related notes for PHYL 1010X

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit