Textbook Notes (368,666)
Canada (162,047)
Physiology (40)
PHYL 1010X (23)
n/a (23)
Chapter

Block A - Synthetic Pathways.docx

4 Pages
135 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Physiology
Course
PHYL 1010X
Professor
n/a
Semester
Summer

Description
Module II Synthetic Pathways INTRODUCTION: In unit 2 you studied the catabolism of biomolecules. In this unit you will learn about their synthesis.  After a brief look at carbohydrates and lipids, proteins will be examined. You will learn about the genetic code and protein synthesis. You may want to review information about  DNA on page 34. Protein synthesis involves two key processes ­ transcription and translation. Transcription  occurs in the nucleus. During transcription, genetic information is transferred from DNA to mRNA. Translation,  on the other hand, occurs in the cytoplasm. During translation, the coded information in mRNA is used to  assemble a protein. The protein is not finished yet. The protein may undergo further modification and must reach  its intended destination. You will see that some of the proteins that are synthesized by the cell remain in the cell,  whereas other proteins are "packaged" for export. The metabolic pathways introduced in Unit 2 function in the synthesis of biomolecules, as well as in  their breakdown. Reversible reactions allow the pathways to "run in reverse". Figure 4­22 depicts the reverse of  glycolysis ­­ gluconeogenesis. Amino acids, lactate, pyruvate and glycerol can enter this pathway and produce  glucose. Note that glucose cannot be created from fatty acids. The glycolysis pathway can be used to create  triglyceride as shown in figure 4­23. Glycogenolysis • The breakdown of glycogen into glycolysis intermediates o Glycogen + P i▯G6P  ▯Glycolysis o Glycogen  + H O  ▯Glucose + ATP  ▯G6P  ▯Glycolysis 2 • 90% of the time converted to G6P, saving the cell 1 ATP molecule Glycogenesis • The synthesis of glycogen from glucose • The reverse process of glycogen breakdown o Glucose linked together into glycogen o G6P synthesized into glycogen by the removal of a P­group Gluconeogenesis • The production of glucose from non­glucose precursors such as proteins or glycerol  portions of lipids • Similar to reverse glycolysis but with different enzymes/precursors o AA/Lactate/Glycerol  ▯Pyruvate  ▯Gluconeogenesis  ▯G6P  ▯Glucose Lipid Synthesis • The production of lipids by combining glycerol + FA in the SER • Difficult to generalize synthesis because lipids are so diverse • 1 Glycerol + 3 FA  ▯Triglyceride o Glycerol made from glucose via glycolysis o 2­C acyl units from acetyl CoA linked by fatty acid synthetase to form FA Protein Synthesis: 1 Module II Synthetic Pathways Proteins are extremely important and diverse. You should know the sequence of events, and where they  occur, during transcription and translation. Figure 4­28 is a good summary. Proteins have to be guided to their  intended destination and may need further processing. Figure 4­29 depicts the pathway for proteins that are to  be secreted from the cell. Gene A region of DNA that contains all the information needed to make a functional piece of  mRNA.  DNA Deoxyribonucleic acid; a nucleotide that stores genetic information in the nucleus. RNA Ribonucleic acid; a nucleotide that interprets the genetic information stored in DNA &  uses it to direct protein synthesis. Chromosome A threadlike strand of DNA and protein in the cell nucleus that carries the genes in a linear  order. Genome The full DNA sequence of an organism. Transcription Once a gene is activated, transcription converts its DNA base sequence into a functional  piece of RNA (mRNA). Tr
More Less

Related notes for PHYL 1010X

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit