Textbook Notes (369,133)
Canada (162,403)
Physiology (40)
PHYL 1010X (23)
n/a (23)
Chapter

Block A - Osmosis and Tonicity.docx

3 Pages
137 Views

Department
Physiology
Course Code
PHYL 1010X
Professor
n/a

This preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full 3 pages of the document.
Description
Module III Osmosis & Tonicity INTRODUCTION: In Unit 1 you studied how solutes cross a membrane. Unit 2 will cover the movement of water. Suppose  a membrane separates two solutions with different solute concentrations. Also assume that the membrane is  impermeable to the solute (there is no way for the solute to cross the membrane), but water can freely pass  through. Water will move through the membrane from the side with the lower solute concentration to that with  the higher solute concentration. The water will "dilute" the higher concentration solution. This can also be  thought of in terms of the "water concentration". The higher the solute concentration, the lower the water  concentration. So water moves from the side with higher "water concentration" to the side with lower "water  concentration" until equilibrium is reached (no net water movement). The concepts of osmolarity and tonicity will be presented. These are important concepts. Make sure you  understand them. The cell membrane separates the body into intracellular and extracellular compartments. The  extracellular compartment includes the interstitial fluid and blood plasma. The fluid amounts for each  compartment are given in figure 5­25. Note that 2/3 (~28 L) of the fluid is in the intracellular compartment, with  the remaining 1/3 (~14 L) split with 75% in the interstitial fluid and only 25% in the blood plasma. 3 Body Fluid Compartments: • Note that plasma makes up 25% of the ECF with the interstitial fluid making up the other 75% Intracellular Fluid (ICF) Extracellular Fluid (ECF) 67% 33% (Plasma = 8%) (Interstitial Fluid = 25%) Unit 1 explored the movement of solutes through the membrane. In this unit, you will be studying the  movement of water ­ osmosis (figure 5­26). Osmolarity and tonicity are important concepts (figure 5­28, tables  5­6 and 5­7). Take the time to understand them. Osmosis: The movement of water across a membrane in response to a solute concentration gradient. Osmotic Pressure: • The pressure that exactly opposes a given concentration gradient • Important factor is the # of particles in a solution, not the number of molecules + ­ o Some molecule dissociate into ions when they dissolve into a solution (NaCl  ▯Na  and Cl) • Water moves by osmosis in response to the total concentration of particles in a solution o Increasing particles = Increasing osmotic pressure The molarity of a solution reflects the number of molecules of a substance in a solution. Osmolarity  reflects the number of particles of a substance in a solution. If a molecule dissociates into 2 or more particles  when in solution, the osmolarity is greater than the molarity of the solution. For example, NaCl dissociates into  1 Module III Osmosis & Tonicity 2 particles in solution ­­ Na  and Cl. Therefore, the osmolarity of a 1 M solution will be 2 OsM. Glucose does  not dissociate in water, so a 1M solution of glucose will also be a 1 OsM solution. Osmolarity: The number of particles (ions or intact molecules) per liter of solution. Measured in osmoles per  liter (OsM). Isosmotic: 2 solutions with the same osmolarity (same concentration, same a
More Less
Unlock Document

Only page 1 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit