Textbook Notes (367,765)
Canada (161,379)
Physiology (40)
PHYL 1010X (23)
n/a (23)
Chapter

Block A - Control Signals.docx

5 Pages
122 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Physiology
Course
PHYL 1010X
Professor
n/a
Semester
Summer

Description
Module IV Control Pathways INTRODUCTION: In this unit you will learn that homeostasis is a dynamic state of equilibrium in which the internal  conditions of the body change, but the change is always within a very narrow range. Fluctuations in the internal  environment (the extracellular fluid of the body) do occur, but special regulatory mechanisms (control systems)  are in place to keep these fluctuations within a specified range. Since the body is composed of many organ  systems, and organ systems can influence each other, a highly developed communications network is required to  maintain order. This communication and control network is provided by the nervous and endocrine systems. Homeostasis: • Ability of the body to maintain a relatively stable environment o Continuous process that uses a physiological control system to monitor key function, which are  called regulated variables • Control systems have 3 basic parts o An input signal (consists of regulated variable & a specialized sensor) o A controller which is programmed to respond to certain input signals (acts as an integrating  center to initiate response to maintain homeostasis, often a neuron or endocrine cell) o An output signal (consists of effectors which effect the change to occur) 4 Parameters Controlled by Homeostatic Responses: There are many examples of control pathways in the body. There are parameters that are controlled  locally and others that involve reflex control. Figure 6­22 looks at the differences. You will encounter these  concepts over and over again during your study of physiology. 1. The nervous system has a role in preserving the ‘fitness’ of the internal environment • Fitness = Conditions compatible with normal function • Coordinates/integrates blood volume, blood osmolarity, BP and body temperature 2. Some systems of the body are under tonic control • An agent may exist which has moderate activity which can be varied up and down • Ongoing control that is adjusting up or down o Think of it as radio volume control  ▯Never turned on/off rather it increases or decreases  response • Neural regulation of diameter in blood vessels 3. Some systems of the body are under antagonistic control • Hormones or neurons with opposing effects on some homeostatic function • Systems not under tonic control are under antagonistic control • Hormones or the nervous systems involved o Insulin & glucagon are antagonistic hormones o Sympathetic/parasympathetic portions of the nervous system have opposing effects 4. One chemical signal can have different effects in different tissues • Homeostatic agents antagonistic in one area of the body may be cooperative in another • Chemical signals can have different effects depending on the receptor & signal pathway 1 Module IV Control Pathways o Epinephrine constricts or dilates blood vessels depending on α or β receptors Local & Reflex Control of Homeostatic Responses: • Paracrine and autocrine signals are responsible for the simplest control systems Local Control Reflex Control Cells in the vicinity of the change initiate the response Cells at a distant site control the response Local Control: • Cell/tissue senses a change in its immediate vicinity  ▯Immediately responds • Restricted to the region where the change took place Reflex Control: An example of a reflex control is the body temperature control system. If the body temperature begins to  drop, special sensors (detectors) detect the drop, and relay the information via afferent nerves to the central  nervous system. The central nervous system (CNS) in turn sends messages (nerve impulses) to (i) skin blood  vessels causing them to constrict, and (ii) skeletal muscles causing them to contract rapidly (shiver). These  actions produce a rise in body temperature. This increase in temperature is detected by the temperature sensors  and the information is relayed to the central nervous system. The central nervous system "decides" if the  increase is enough to bring the temperature within the specified range that it has set. If not, the whole process is  repeated until the temperature is within the specified range. Too much of an increase in temperature will result  in yet another, but different, set of compensations designed to bring the temperature down to the setpoint. Body  temperature will fluctuate around the setpoint but the fluctuations will be kept within a very narrow range. • Coordination of reaction occurs at a distant site • Long­distance pathways that use the nervous system, endocrine system or both to receive input about a  change, integrate the information & react appropriately • 2 parts  ▯A response loop & a feedback loop Response Loop: • 3 primary components  ▯Input signal, integration of the signal & an output signal • Begin with a stimulus, end with a response • Steps involved 1. Stimulus is the disturbance or change that sets the pathway in motion 2. Stimulus sensed by a sensor or sensory receptor that continuously monitors the environment 3. Alerted to change, the sensory receptor send a signal, or afferent (incoming) pathway that links  the receptor to the integrating center 4. Integrating center evaluates incoming signal, compares it to setpoint (desired value) & decides  on appropriate response 5. Integrating center initiates the output signal, or efferent (outgoing) pathway that travels to the  effector 6. Effector (target) is the cell/tissue that carries out the response to bring the situation back within  normal limits Stimulus  ▯Sensor or Receptor  ▯Afferent Pathway  ▯Integrating Center  ▯Efferent Pathway ▯ 2 Module IV Control Pathways Target or Effector  ▯Response Step Nervous System Response Loop Endocrine System Response Loop Stimulus Activation of a sensor/receptor by the stimulus Sensor/Receptor Special & somatic sensory receptors  Endocrine cell Afferent Pathway Afferent sensory neuron carrier  No afferent pathway because endocrine  electrical & chemical NT signals  cells act as both sensor & integrating center  for the reflex Integrating Center CNS (brain or spinal cord)
More Less

Related notes for PHYL 1010X

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit