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Readings.pdf

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Department
Anthropology
Course Code
ANTH 209
Professor
Emilie Parent

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FIONA BOWIE The Origins of Religion Principles of Sociology Herbert Spencer Simple things can become more complexed organisms Ghosts become gods Explain food offerings Animism Animated and non-animated things have souls Bronislaw Malinowski One of the founders of the functionalist school of anthropology F: the interrelations between the various elements of a social system Émile Durkheim Collective representation Religion is a projection of a society's values Defining Religion The translation of words does not always project the actual meaning of the words Usually based on European definitions World Religion features Based on written scriptures Notion of salvation, often from outside Universal, or universal potential Supplant a primal religion Forms a separate sphere of activity Primal Religion features Oral "This-worldly" Confined to single languages or ethnic groups Bases from which world religions originated Religion and social life are intertwined Where's the line between a primal religion and a world religion? Introduction to Ritual Theory, Rites of Passage, and Ritual Violence Purposes Role in healing, maintaining culture, expressing emotions, restoring balance, etc What Is Ritual? A performance that effects a transition from everyday life to an alternative context Religious ritual: a prescribed formal behaviour for occasions not given over to technical routine, having reference to a higher being Or: opening ordinary life to ultimate reality or some transcendent being or force in order to tap its transformative power "I know one when I see one" Problem: cross-cultural comparisons with Western ideas that don't always fit other cultures Rituals are socially constructed Bell's types Rite of passage of life crisis rituals Calendrical and commemorative rites Rites of exchange and communion Rites of affliction Rites of feasting, fasting, and festivals Political rituals
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