Textbook Notes (368,316)
Canada (161,798)
Philosophy (44)
PHIL 237 (13)
Chapter 5

Ethics: the Fundamentals, chapter 5

6 Pages
180 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHIL 237
Professor
Kristin Voigt
Semester
Winter

Description
Julia Driver, Ethics: the Fundamentals Chapter 5: Kantian Ethics, pp. 80 – 101 Immanuel Kant, Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals: “A good will is good not because of what it effects or accomplishes, not because of its  fitness to attain some proposed end: it is good only through its willing, i.e. good in itself.” Kantian ethics = a form of deontological ethics, i.e. an ethical theory that defines right independently  of the good. Kant denies any consequentialist elements to his theory. Instead, whether or not a  contemplated course of action is morally permissible will depend on whether or not it conforms to what  he terms the moral law, the categorical imperative. Our duties can be understood in terms of  respecting this imperative, even if respecting the moral law leads to bad effects rather than good  ones. One of the ideas underlying Kant’s theory is that what makes an action wrong is what of action it is,  not its outcomes. According to Kant, morality is based on reason rather than sentiment (the opposing argument being  Hume’s). Morality is a priori, and holds for all rational beings.  “‘Thou shalt not lie’ does not hold only for men, as if other rational beings had no need to  abide by it, and so with all other moral laws properly so called […] the ground of  obligation   here   must   therefore   be   sought   not   in   the   nature   of   man   nor   in   the  circumstances of the world in which man is placed, but must be sought a priori solely in  the concepts of pure reason.” Kant’s entire system of morality is based upon a rejection of Hume’s claim. For Kant, reason is what  makes us capable of morality to begin with. The emphasis that he placed on respect for autonomy, as  opposed to mere concern for well­being or happiness, can be seen in policies that make clear that the  individual has the right to be treated with respect and not simple benevolence. 1 – Reason. David Hume: reason is subordinate to feeling in that reason only has an instrumental role to play in  practical deliberation. It is desire that sets our goals for us – reason simply enables us to choose the means  to achieve those goals. Moreover, the basis for morality can be found in human nature – specifically, our  capacity to sympathize with others. Kant denies the aforementioned claims. He argues that reason can set goals and that it is particularly  required in order to set moral goals, which are independent of our desires. Indeed, the very concept of  a moral duty must be understood independent of desire. Genuine moral duties are categorical and  unconditional. Further, the source of moral authority is not to be found in human nature at all.  Rather, the ground of morality is found in pure reason.  2 – Categorical versus hypothetical imperatives. The moral law is  categorical rather than hypothetical and it is an imperative. A hypothetical  imperative is a contingent command, one that we ought to follow given certain circumstances or factors  (such as our desires). A categorical imperative, however, binds us no matter what our desires are.  This is the nature of morality – obligations bind independent of our desires; they are based in reason. 3 – Duty versus inclination. Aristotle has argued that the best and most virtuous person is the person who exhibits harmonious  psychological functioning. That is, it is necessary for the virtuous person to have the best parts of  the soul, the desiring and judgment parts, in harmony. Thus, what we are inclined to do should be in  harmony with our knowledge of what is right to do, our knowledge of our duty.  Kant believed a different thing. He argued that if we  act well and are solely motivated by good  inclination, we lack moral worth. Genuine moral worth is not motivated by inclination. Animals act on  inclination. What differentiates us from them is our capacity to use reason, to make rational judgments  about what we ought to do. From the moral point of view, what is important to moral worth is  whether or not the sense of duty is what is motivating our actions. Inclination is not necessary. Desires  are too volatile to be a firm ground for moral motivation. The commands of reason do not change.  Even love is subject to this: according to Kant, the love that matters, morally speaking, is the one out of  duty.  Criticisms and responses: This view has been criticized as being too cold. Michael Stocker has argued that this take on feelings in  unhealthy. According to him, friendship works because people want to spend time together, and are  inclined to do so – regardless of duty or obligation.  Marcia Baron defends the Kantian perspective on this subject. According to her, friendship out of duty  does not rule out a good inclination.  The general criticism of Kant’s view is that he gives emotions an instrumental value. Emotions interfere  with moral behavior, as much as they can help it. There is no recognition of their intrinsic value.  However, Kant does not view those emotions in a negative way. Rather, his argument is that they have no  moral worth. There is a difference between following a rule and behaving in such a way that our actions  happen to conform to that rule. Admiration is deserved for following a rule due to a duty rather than an  inclination. 4 – The categorical imperative. 4.1. Formulation one. Immanuel Kant, Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals: “Act only according to that maxim whereby you can at the same time will that it should  become a universal law.” 1) The agent formulates a maxim describing the action he will perform. 2) The agent verifies if this maxim can be universalized or not. CONTRADICTION IN CONCEPTION. When a maxim cannot be universalized, it’s a contradiction in  conception, which means it’s a logical contradiction. Kant’s clearest example of this is the person who  needs money and falsely promises to pay it back though he never intends to.  The person’s maxim is:  when you need money, borrow it by falsely promising to pay it back.  Imagine that everyone did that.  Then nobody would believe anybody’s promises to pay back money, and so the person’s action would  have to be unsuccessful.  By willing that everyone should follow the maxim, one will have nullified  the point of the maxim—the maxim would then be quite useless.  The maxim to borrow under false  pretenses only works if a few people follow it: if everybody does, it no longer succeeds.  That is why  Kant thinks that it’s wrong to act on this maxim. The question to ask when one is testing one’s maxim is: can we will that everyone be allowed to do this?  However, this question does not show the contradiction in conception that we find when asking “can we  will that everyone do this?” and which underlies Kant’s first formulation according to Paton. It has been suggested that this is a misinterpretation, because Kant, rather than discussing a  logical  contradiction was discussing a practical one. When an agent tests a maxim and gets a contradiction in  conception, the purpose that is undermined by the universalization of the maxim is the purpose that  appears in the maxim itself. CONTRADICTION IN THE WILL. Some maxims produce states that no rational agent would want.  (Paton’s interpretatio
More Less

Related notes for PHIL 237

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit