Textbook Notes (368,325)
Canada (161,799)
Philosophy (44)
PHIL 237 (13)
Chapter

Weinstock "Does religion matter?" (Conscientious refusal)

5 Pages
187 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHIL 237
Professor
Kristin Voigt
Semester
Winter

Description
Bioethics,   2013,   Daniel   Weinstock,  “Conscientious   refusal   and   health  professionals: does religion make a difference?”, pp. 1 – 8 This article explores the health care professionals’ objections of conscience due to religious matters.  Thesis: it is more difficult to ground an obligation on the part of healthcare systems to accommodate  religious objections than it is to accommodate the more recognizably ethical concerns of health care  professionals. Structure of the article: • Avoid conflating freedom of conscience and religious freedom, because both  refer to different sets of moral consideration. • The most convincing reason for granting a right to conscientious refusal in the  area of health care (four reasons). • The results of both previous arguments to show that there are no analogous  reasons to accommodate religious claims for exemption in the healthcare sector. • First limit of the thesis: the article only applies to ‘irreducibly’ religious  objections of conscience. • Second limit of the thesis: although health care professionals who ask for an  exemption for irreducibly religious have no right to, there might be societal  reasons to accept them. I – The difference between freedom of conscience and religious freedom. As a question of general political morality, those two rights ought to be treated as protecting two  distinct sets of normative considerations.  (First set of normative considerations.) Conscience: refers to the citizen as a moral being capable of  reflecting upon the difficult moral questions they must face in the roles they occupy, including that of  ‘citizen’.  This   is   further   expressed  by   the   citizen’s  ability   to  reflect   upon   moral   issues   and  controversies arising in their community  (or elsewhere) and to  arrive at judgments about what  should be done in such controversies.  Why should the state protect the individual’s ability to live by the dictates of their conscience? 1. When an individual is forced to violate their conscience by the state or the institutions they  belong to, they feel they have been disrespected in a fundamental way. The essence of a  human being consists partly of their conscience and to disrespect this is to disrespect their  existence as a moral agent capable of reasoning and making moral decisions. (Internal argument) 2. The state has an interest in protecting and promoting the capacity for moral reflection on  the part of citizens. Democratic debate and deliberation are central to the best accounts of both  the justification for democracy and the best way to organize democratic institutions.  Good  democracies are ones in which deliberation occurs not just among political representatives  but  also among citizens  themselves.  THUS,  good democracies  require that citizens  be  encouraged and enabled to think for themselves about complex issues of political morality.  (External argument) (Second set of normative considerations.) Freedom of religion: is associated with Samuel Scheffler’s  theory. According to Scheffler, situating oneself within a tradition, whether it is religious or not, is a  way of overcoming obstacles and situating themselves within temporal contexts that transcend their  own individual lives. The practices that one takes in as a member of a tradition are central to the agent’s  ability to deal with his own temporal finitude. Members of those traditions feel strongly about the rules to  abide to, etc. so the state must be able to give those people the freedom to act the ways that are required  by the tradition to which they belong. Thus, there are internal reasons for those religious rights,  which means allowing the individuals to perform what they must according to their tradition. One  such tradition is religion, because it is extremely important in the lives of many individuals and  continues to transcend despite the evolution of science.  What of the external considerations? - Those considerations (being the conceptual connection between democracy on one hand and the  morally alert citizen on the other) are not present in the same way for freedom of religion. - Religions are not as intrinsically connected to the very idea of democracy as are the benefits of a  society in which citizens hold an independent moral judgment. An entirely secular society can  still be a democracy.  There are different sets of reasons to limit the state’s power over the individual contained in  the phrase “freedom of conscience and religion”, even though it may be tempting to regard  both as identical phenomena. FINAL REMARK: claims on the grounds of freedom of religion have to be reasonable, but there is no  reason not to see these considerations of “reasonability” being applied to the freedom of conscience as  well. ON THE ARGUMENT OF INTEGRITY: it may be argued that freedom of conscience and religion have  to be treated in the same way on the grounds of integrity (both as directly linked to the individual’s  integrity and thus must be respected in the same way). HOWEVER, Weinstock argues that the kinds of  integrity that are in play in conscience and religion protections are actually quite different.  • Freedom of conscience  protects the process and the  results of moral reflection. • Freedom of religion  protects the agent’s ability to  continue to participate in rites and practices, and to  follow communal rules, the principal function o
More Less

Related notes for PHIL 237

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit