Textbook Notes (367,976)
Canada (161,540)
POLI 244 (71)
Chapter

The Spread of Nuclear Weapons More May Be Better K Waltz Edited.txt

5 Pages
89 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
POLI 244
Professor
Fernando Nunez- Mietz
Semester
Fall

Description
Ibs, you may find this webpage useful as it answers in snapshot anaylses' this issue with yes and no  arguments as to The Spread of Nuclear weapons Why More May Be Better:  http://debatewise.org/debates/748­the­spread­of­nuclear­weapons­more­may­be­better/  But here is my, below:  1. Outline:  In 1981 Kenneth Waltz published a controversial Adelphi Paper, The Spread of Nuclear Weapons: More  May Be Better, in which he turned the conventional wisdom on its head by arguing that the spread of  nuclear weapons would not be a terrifying prospect. This article rejects the proposition that fear of nuclear  destruction can serve as a permanent basis of international order, and argues that securing order depends  upon the building of trust between nuclear­armed and arming powers. A key contribution here has been the  theory and practice of security communities, which opens up the promise of replacing nuclear threats by a  new international politics in which force has been delegitimated as an instrument of state policy. This article  discusses the potential for nuclear trust­building through the example of the security community that  developed between Argentina and Brazil in the 1980s. Both countries had the potential to develop nuclear  weapons by the end of the 1970s, and there were concerns that their rivalry might lead to a regional nuclear  arms race. Having explored the factors that promoted trust between Buenos Aires and Brasilia, the article  considers the lessons that can be learned for nuclear trust­building elsewhere.  2. Background:  If the build­up of nuclear weapons was a significant factor in maintaining the "long peace" between the  United States and the Soviet Union, will the spread of nuclear weapons beyond these two superpowers  stabilize or disrupt international relations. In this book, two scholars of international politics debate the  issue. Kenneth Waltz argues that fear of the spread of nuclear weapons is unfounded ­ "more may be  better". Nuclear proliferation may be a stabilizing force, as it decreases the likelihood of war by increasing  its costs. Scott Sagan, however, argues that nuclear proliferation will make the world less stable ­ "more will  be worse". Nuclear­armed states may not possess the internal structures that would ensure safe and  rational control of nuclear weapons. Written for a general audience, this book is intended to help the public  understand more clearly the role of nuclear weapons in the new world order.  3. Kenneth Waltz Intro on the subject:  What will the spread of nuclear weapons do to the world? I say spread rather than proliferation because so  far nuclear weapons have proliferated only vertically as the major nuclear powers have added to their  arsenals. Horizontally, they have spread slowly across countries, and the pace is not likely to change much.  Short­term candidates for the nuclear club are not very numerous. and they are not likely to rush into the  nuclear military business. Nuclear weapons will nevertheless spread, with a new member occasionally  joining the club. Counting India and Israel, membership grew to seven in the first 35 years of the nuclear  age. A doubling of membership in this decade would be surprising. Since rapid changes in international  conditions can be unsettling, the slowness of the spread of nuclear weapons is fortunate.    Someday the world will be populated by ten or twelve or eighteen nuclear­weapon states (hereafter referred  to as nuclear states). What the further spread of nuclear weapons will do to the world is therefore a  compelling question.    Most people believe that the world will become a more dangerous one as nuclear weapons spread. The  chances that nuclear weapons will be fired in anger or accidentally exploded in a way that prompts a  nuclear exchange are finite, though unknown. Those chances increase as the number of nuclear states  increase. More is therefore worse. Most people also believe that the chances that nuclear weapons will be  used vary with the character of the new nuclear statestheir sense of responsibility, inclination toward  devotion to the status quo, political and administrative competence. If the supply of states of good character  is limited as is widely thought, then the larger the number of nuclear states, the greater the chances of  nuclear war become. If nuclear weapons are acquired by countries whose governments totter and  frequently fall, should we not worry more about the worlds destruction then we do now? And if nuclear  weapons are acquired by two states that are traditional and bitter rivals, should that not also foster our  concern?    Predictions on grounds such as the above point less to likelihoods and more to dangers that we can all  imagine. They identify some possibilities among many, and identifying more of the possibilities would not  enable one to say how they are likely to unfold in a world made different by the slow spread of nuclear  weapons. We want to know both the likelihood that new dangers will manifest themselves and what the  possibilities of their mitigation may be. We want to be able to see the future world, so to speak, rather than  merely imagining ways in which it may be a better or a worse one.  How can we predict more surely? In two  ways:  by deducing expectations from the structure of the international political system and by inferring  expectations from past events and patterns. With those two tasks accomplished in the first part of this  paper, I shall ask in the second part whether increases in the number of nuclear states will introduce  differences that are dangerous and destabilizing.  4. Notes:  Critique of Kenneth Waltz arguement:  Nuclear Proliferation in the modern day is one of the most heated topics as a result of, not only the various  schools of thought on the topic, but also the fact that the subject has in the end become a critical matter of  international security. This paper will aim to explain that, though both views on the proliferation and  nonproliferation of nuclear weapons hold very strong arguments, both have weak spots in their claims as  well. In order to properly assess the arguments, the paper will surround itself on key issues such as the  safety of nuclear deterrence and the effectiveness of disarmament treaties to show the strengths and  weaknesses both sides withhold. To start off, the proliferation argument supporting nuclear deterrence will  first be briefly explained through the views of Kenneth Waltz. Following, it will then be shown that the views  of a nonproliferation advocate, such as Robert Fischer, could easily debunk such a claim. Further on, the  weaker nonproliferation argument on the effectiveness the role of nonproliferation treaties has within the  international community will be discussed and examined. Finally, this nonproliferation based­argument will  then be rebuked by the stronger, John Mearsheimers case supporting the selective proliferation of nuclear  weapons. Essentially, this essay will show that although specific disputes on issues concerning nuclear  proliferation can be assessed based upon which one is side is more effective with their argument, the  general debate over nuclear disarmament is a more slightly ambiguous one to answer.  For proliferation advocates, such as Kenneth Waltz, nuclear deterrence is one of the greatest, if not one of  the best, ways to bring about peace.  Nuclear deterrence is seen by Waltz as a states ability to withhold the  means to cancel the gains of an attacker.[1] Waltz basically argues that a deterrent strategy makes it  unnecessary for a country to fight for the sake of increasing its security, and that this removes a major  cause of war. Henceforth there is the argument that the Cold War is a prime example of how nuclear  deterrence brought about one of the longest eras of peace the world had ever seen. The world observed  two nuclear powers at their best; not attacking one another, learning to adapt to other nuclear powers, and  helping other states evolve into nuclear powers with deterrent strategies, essentially promoting peace  through fear. It is the general assumption of Waltz that no matter the number of nuclear states, a nuclear  world becomes tolerable when they are able to send deterrent messages out.[2] To Waltz and other  proliferation advocates, a select few should not be held above the rest when give nuclear capabilities. In  fact, Waltz crit
More Less

Related notes for POLI 244

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit