Textbook Notes (368,326)
Canada (161,799)
Psychology (1,418)
PSYC 100 (131)
Chapter 2

Chapter 2 Notes.docx

6 Pages
106 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 100
Professor
Daniel J Levitin
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 2­Reading The scientific Method ­Systematic ­Scientist use objective procedures ­free from bias if another uses the same procedure with same people we would  expect the same results.  Scientific Inquiry 4 Basic Goals…to be more confident in conclusions drawn from observations what­ describing happenings when­ predicting happenings why­ controlling happenings what 2 explaining happenings 3 Elements of Scientific Method Theory: explanation/model of how something works and interconnects ideas                       and concepts ­use to explain prior observations ­make predictions about the future Hypothesis: specific testable prediction about the outcome supporting theory Research: careful collection of data object info that provides a test of              hypothesis ­When research is replicated we have more confidence ­repeating study and getting the same results view page 37 diagram Piaget  ▯child development theories led to a number of hypotheses Freud  ▯interpretation of dream generated few testable hypotheses ­Good theories should generate wide varieties of testable hypotheses *Unexpected findings can be valuable  = SERENDIPITY : unexpected discovery of something important. view summing up Types of studies in psychology research Designs: ­descriptive     ­correlational     ­experimental Descriptive/Observational studies ­observing and noting behavior to analyze it objectively Keep track of a participant’s, at a point in time, behaviours may take years to unfold. ­naturalistic observation observer separate from situation and makes no attempt  to change the situation. ­participant observation researcher involved in situation 1 2 Advantage:  valuable in early stages of research when determining if a phenomena exists.  Takes place in a  real world setting. Disadvantage:  Errors in observation because of an observer’s bias may occur.  Presence of observer can  change behaviour witnessed. Longitudinal Studies ­changes that occur over time  ­seeing future development due to interventions Advantage: Provides information about effects of age that allow researchers to see developmental changes. Disadvantage:  expensive,  long,  may lose participants over time. Cross­Sectional Studies ­comparing different groups to make inferences about both at the same time. Advantage:  faster,  less expensive Disadvantage: unidentifiable variables (3  variable problem) *Observer Bias systematic errors in observation that occur because of an observer’s  expectation. ­It can change the behaviour being observed = Experimenter Expectancy Effect The mice had faster recorded results because the participants were told they  were “runners” ­Some aspects of our own behaviour are not under our conscious control. ­It is best if the person running the study is blind or unaware of study’s hypotheses. Correlation Studies ­examine variables related in the world without research attempting to alter  them A variable that the researcher did not control Popular because, they rely on naturally occurring relationships Possibly required for ethical reasons Problems 1) Cannot be used to support causal relationship (one thing happened due to another) 2) Directionality cannot show the direction of the cause/effect relationship  between the variables (A▯B ; B▯A) 3) An unidentified variable maybe involved. (Third Variable Problem C    caused A & B ) *Typically researchers use stats to rule out potential problems Experimental studies                 ­Researcher has maximum control over the situation ­researcher manipulates one variable to examine that variable’s effect on a     second variable. ­Control group (comparison) Participant received no intervention or different intervention from  the one being studied. ­Experiment group (treatment) 1 Participant that recei2e intervention A:  demonstrate causal relationships,  avoids directionality D: takes place in artificial setting Independent variable: variable manipulated Dependent variable: variable measured *Confound: Anything that affects dependent variable and may unintentionally vary between study’s  experiment conditions. ­By eliminating and preventing possible confounds, a researcher can be more confident that  The independent variable caused the change in the dependent variable Random Assignment is used to establish equivalent groups The only way to make group’s equivalency more likely is to use random  assignment. Each participant has an equal chance of being assigned to any  level of independent variable. ­Individual differences are likely to exist, but these differences are likely to average out  as participants are assigned to either the control or experimental groups randomly ­random assignment also balances out known and unknown factors Population ▯ everyone in the group the experimenter is interested in Sample  ▯subset people who are studied Random sampling  ▯each member of population has an equal chance of  being chosen Convenience sampling  ▯people available for the study (most often the case in psychological  experiments) *A larger sample size will provide a more accurate estimate of a population than a smaller sample  size *selection bias: when groups are not equivalent because participants differ between     conditions systematically  Meta­analysis  ▯analysis on studies that have already been conducted ­provides a stronger evidence ­has the concept of replication built into it Data Collection Methods The data collection method used must be appropriate for questions at the  level of analysis Bio Level  ▯measure brain processes and different hormones using brain       imaging Individual Level  ▯individual difference among participants responses using       questioning on indirect assessments Social Level  ▯observing people within a single culture and how they interact
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 100

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit