Textbook Notes (369,072)
Canada (162,366)
Psychology (1,418)
PSYC 211 (154)
Chapter 18

Chapter 18 Notes.docx

2 Pages
136 Views

Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSYC 211
Professor
Yogita Chudasama

This preview shows 80% of the first page. Sign up to view the full 2 pages of the document.
Description
Chapter 18: Drug Abuse Notes taken by: Ashley Brown Contact for mistakes: [email protected] Common Features of Addiction Even though drugs cause bad things, people continue to use them because they stimulate brain mechanisms responsible for positive reinforcement. Their immediate effects are more powerful than the realization that in the long term, bad things will happen. Alcohol  car accidents, fetal alcohol syndrome, Korsakoff’s 
 syndrome, heart disease, intracerebral hemorrhage Smoking  Lung cancer, heart attack, stroke, less healthy babies, babies with smaller brains. Cocaine
  psychotic behaviour, brain damage, death by overdose, competition for lucrative and illegal markets, causes violent deaths. A Little Background Found substances in nature that had medicinal qualities. Also discovered recreational ones that produced pleasurable effects when consumed Addictive drugs and their site of action: - ethyl alcohol  NMDA receptor (indirect antagonist), GABA receptAr (indirect agonist) - Barbiturates  GABA receptor (indirect agonist) A - Benzodiazepines (tranquilizers)  GABA recepAor (indirect agonist) - Cannabis (marijuana)  CB can1abinoid receptor (agonist) - Nicotine  Nicotinic ACh receptor (agonist) - Opiates (heroin, morphine, etc.)  μ and δ opiate receptor agonist - Phencyclidine (PCP) and ketamine  NMDA receptor (indirect antagonist) - Cocaine  blocks reuptake of dopamine (and serotonin and norepinephrine) - Amphetamine  causes release of dopamine (by running dopamine transporters in reverse) Positive Reinforcement Positive reinforcement refers to the effec
More Less
Unlock Document

Only 80% of the first page are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit