Textbook Notes (368,122)
Canada (161,660)
Commerce (1,690)
Chapter 1

Chapter 1

7 Pages
78 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Commerce
Course
COMMERCE 1BA3
Professor
Emad Mohammad
Semester
Fall

Description
Accounting – Chapter 1 – Financial Statements and Business Decisions Owner­manager – when the founder also functions as the manager of the business Investors – individuals who buy small percentages of large corporations; make their purchases  hoping to gain in two ways: 1. Dividends – Receive a portion of what the company earns in the form of cash payments  (aka dividends)  2. Hope to eventually sell their share for more than they paid for it When money is exchanged with lenders and owners it is called financing activities. When a company buys or sells property it is called investing activities. The Accounting System Developing accounting information for internal decision makers is called managerial or  management accounting (detailed plans and continuous performance reports.) Developing accounting information for external decision makers is called financial accounting  (periodic financial statements and related disclosures.) Accounting: A system that collects and processes (analyzes, measures and records) financial  information about an organization and reports that information to decision makers. The 4 Basic Financial Statements – Overview The four basic financial statements include: 1. Statement of financial position 2. Statement of comprehensive income 3. Statement of changes in equity 4. Statement of cash flows The Statement of Financial Position Statement of financial position (balance sheet): reports the financial position (amount of  assets, liabilities and shareholders’ equity) of an accounting entity at a particular point in time. Structure: the heading of the statement of financial position identifies four significant items 1. Name of the entity – the organization (company,) not the owner 2. Title of the statement – statement of financial position (balance sheet) 3. Specific date of the statement – At month, day, year 4. Unit of measure – (in millions of i.e. Swiss francs) Assets = Liabilities  +  Shareholders’  Economic  Sources of financing for the economic resources Equity resources Liabilities: from creditors Shareholders’ Equity: from shareholders The basic accounting equation shows what we mean by a company’s financial position: the  economic resources that the company owns and the sources of financing for those resources. The statement of financial position is like a snapshot clearly sating the entity’s financial position  at a specific point in time. Trade receivables – when a company sells its products on credit and receives promises to pay,  which are collected in cash later. Trade payables – when a company purchases goods and services from suppliers on credit,  without a formal written contract (or note) Short­term borrowings – amounts borrowed from banks and other creditors, to be repaid in the  near future. Income taxes payable – represent an amount due to the government’s tax authorities as a result  of the company’s profitable operations. Accrued liabilities – amounts owed to suppliers of various types of services, such as rent and  utilities. Long­term borrowings – result from cash borrowings based on formal written debt contracts  with lending institutions such as banks. Provisions – estimated amounts payable in the future, but the exact amount and timing of the  payment depends on actual future events. Shareholders’ equity – indicates the amount of financing provided by owners of shares in the  business as well as earnings over time. Shareholders’ equity arises from 3 sources: 1. Share capital – the investment of cash and other assets in the business by the owners in  exchange for shares 2. Retained earnings – the amount of earnings reinvested in the business (and thus not  distributed to shareholders in the form of dividends) 3. Other components – essentially reflect the changes in the values of assets and liabilities  over time A note on format: Assets can be listed in order of most liquid to least or vice versa.  Liabilities can be listed in increasing or decreasing order of maturity. Most financial statements include the monetary unit sign (i.e. $) beside the first amount in a  group of items. It is common to place a single underline below the last item in a group before a  total or subtotal and a double underline below group totals. The Statement of Comprehensive Income Statement of comprehensive income: reports the change in shareholders’ equity, during a  period, from business activities, excluding exchanges with shareholders. It includes all changes in equity during a period except those resulting from investments by  owners and distributions to owners.  It has two parts. The first part reports the accountant’s primary measure of a company’s  performance: revenues generated less expenses incurred during the account period. This is  labeled “profit.” The second part reports other comprehensive income, which comprises income and expense  items that are not recognized in the income statement in accordance with International Financial  Reporting Standards. Companies can present all items of income and expenses either in one statement of  comprehensive income or in two related statements 0 an income statement reporting the revenues  and expenses that have already affected profit, and a statement of comprehensive income  reporting income and expense items that will affect profit in the future. Income statement – reports the revenues less the expenses of the accounting period. It reports information for a specified period of time. IS equation is Revenues – Expenses = Profit Revenues are normally reported on the income statement when the goods or services are sold to  customers whether or not they have been paid for.  Cost of sales – cost of goods sold, what it cost to produce the items sold. Distribution expenses – variety of expenses such as the salaries of sales staff and expenses  related to the distribution of products. Marketing and administrative expenses – include items such as the salaries of marketing and  management personnel, promotion of company’s products through print and electronic media,  rental of office space, insurance, utilities, etc. For account purposed, the expense reported in one accounting period may actually be paid for in  cash in another accounting period. Nevertheless, the company recognizes all expenses (cash and  credit) incurred during a specific accounting period regardless of the timing of the cash payment. If a company owes money to sales people for commission in December 2009 but does not pay  until January 2010, the sales commission would be recognized as expenses for the accounting  period ending on December 21, 2009 because that is when the salespeople earned the  commission. Profit normally does not equal the net cash generated by operations. The Statement of Changes in Equity The statement of changes in equity – reports all changes to shareholders’ equity during the  accounting period. It covers a specific period of time. Retained earnings – reflect the profits that have been earned since the creation of the company  but not distributed yet to shareholders as dividends. Profit earned during the year increases the balance of retained earnings. The declaration of  dividends to the shareholders decreases retained earnings. The retained earnings equation that describes these relationships is: Beginning retained earnings + Profit – Dividends = Ending retained earnings The Statement of Cash Flows Statement of cash flows – reports cash inflows (receipts) and outflows (payments) that are  related to operating, investing and financing activities during the accounting period. Cash inflows and outflows are divided into three primary categories: 1. Cash flows from operating 2. Cash flows from investing 3. Cash flows from financing It covers a specified period of time. Revenues do not always equal cash collected from customers because some sales may be on  credit. Also, expenses reported on the IS may not be equal to cash paid out during the period  because expenses may be incurred in one period and paid for in another.  As a result, profit does not usually equal the amount of cash recei
More Less

Related notes for COMMERCE 1BA3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit