Textbook Notes (368,531)
Canada (161,958)
Commerce (1,696)
Chapter 4

Finance - Chapter 4.docx

5 Pages
144 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Commerce
Course
COMMERCE 2FA3
Professor
Richard Deaves
Semester
Winter

Description
CHAPTER FOUR: ARBITRAGE, EFFICIENCY, AND HEDGING Arbitrage • Arbitrage: the act of attempting to profit from an inconsistency in relative prices • Arises because of relative mispricing • Arbitrageurs seek out and exploit inconsistencies thus eliminating them (prices  move until they are right)  • No arbitrage available if A + B = C • Two ways to convert Canadian dollars into US dollars: (1) Directly from Canadian to US dollars (2) Indirectly using euros as the bridge currency • Bridge currency: convert Canadian dollars to euros and then euros to US dollars • Arbitrage is possible if two ways do not result in the same amount of US currency • Triangular arbitrage: trading has taken you around the triangle starting with a  Canadian dollar and ending up with more than a Canadian dollar • Law of one price: occurs when arbitrage opportunities are absent Is the Law of One Price Perfect? • Always holds in foreign exchange markets (or would be to easy to profit) • Not always the case in financial markets with highly liquid securities • Ex. Royal Dutch/Shell and Palm/3Com • Arbitrageurs run risk of wrong prices becoming even more wrong in short run • Face constraints and career concerns (because managing money on behalf of  others) • Are sometimes unwilling/unable to move prices all the way back to what they  view to be values Efficiency Value vs. Price • Intrinsic value: what a security should be worth • Market price: what the market determines a security is worth • Efficiency is about comparing price to value • Market efficiency (efficient markets hypothesis – EMH): for all securities price  and value are identical  • Must assume: o All info is costless o All investors have immediate access to info • All individuals will process info in same way and arrive at same intrinsic value  estimates • Only a price which just equals everyone’s estimate of intrinsic value can persist in  market because: 1) If price were less demand would be unlimited 2) If price were greater supply would be unlimited • If something anticipated by all occurs markets should not react (ex. Bank of  Canada increases interest rates by 0.25%) • Random walk: if stock price changes are random and unpredictable they will  move in a random fashion Ex. Initially a 5% growth rate was expected but conditions in the economy and industry  change such that all investors revise their estimate of the firm’s growth to 4%. The  intrinsic value immediately declines from $7 to $6.50.   ▯If this were not so there would be profitable opportunities due to short sale of  overvalued securities Three Supports of Market Efficiency • Market efficiency rests on three supports: 1) Investor rationality (all investors are always rational) 2) Uncorrelated errors (same types of mistakes are made by many people at  the same time) 3) Unlimited arbitrage • Only one support is required for market efficiency • If all fail  ▯market efficiency is called into question • It is hoped that a portfolio assembled by a talented investor can on average earn  good returns A More Realistic Definition of Market Efficiency • If efficiency holds: price always equals value • If all info was embedded in prices: o Information­gathering and analysis would not be worthwhile activities o No one would have incentive/ability to find mispriced securities • Choosing to analyze stocks: o Disadvantage: it is costly in terms of one’s time or if have to hire someone  to do analysis o Benefit: those who analyze are able to generate higher gross returns • Gross returns: prior to the deduction of relevant costs • Net returns: all costs have been subtracted • Equilibrium between analyzing and not analyzing: o There is no advantage/disadvantage in changing ones approach o Additional gross return from analyzing is counterbalanced by additional  cost of analyzing o Individuals will be indifferent between pursuing one strategy or the other • Market efficiency:  o No investor can consistently earn excess returns utilizing all relevant info  where excess is meant to be after all costs have been factored in o For a return to be “excess”: risk adjustments must be made and costs (of  transaction and analysis) must be deducted Testing Market Efficiency • Two methodologies for testing validity of market efficiency: (1) Look at professionally managed portfolios and try to find out if they are able  to earn excess returns (ex. pension funds, mutual funds) (2) Use historical data on security returns to investigate whether excess returns  could have been earned using public info • Efficiency tests belong to one of three forms:   Type of  Information Used Efficiency Test Analyst Technical  Use past prices and returns to earn  Weak­form efficient:  Analysts excess returns technical analysts are  wrong Fundamental  Able to make excess returns by  Semi­strong­form  Analysts utilizing all publicly available info  efficient: fundamental  (ex. 
More Less

Related notes for COMMERCE 2FA3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit