Textbook Notes (367,930)
Canada (161,511)
Commerce (1,690)
Chapter 4&9

Info Systems - Chapter 4&9.docx

10 Pages
171 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Commerce
Course
COMMERCE 2KA3
Professor
A L I R M O N T A Z E M I
Semester
Winter

Description
CHAPTER FOUR: SOCIAL, ETHICAL, AND LEGAL ISSUES IN  INFORMATION SYSTEMS Understanding Ethical and Social Issues Related to Systems • Have to decide for yourself what is proper legal and ethical conduct • Perpetrators of failed ethical and legal judgment use financial reporting info  systems to bury decisions from the public • Ethics: principles of right and wrong that individuals use to make choices to guide  behaviours • Info systems raise new ethical questions • IT will produce benefits for many and costs for others • Unleashes new concerns about: o Use of customer information o Protection of privacy o Protection of intellectual property A Model for Thinking about Ethical, Social, and Political Issues • Ethical social and political issues are closely linked • New IT causes new situations that are not covered by old rules • May take years to develop etiquette, expectations, social responsibility, politically  correct attitudes, approved rules • May be forced to act in legal grey area for a while  Five Moral Dimensions of the Information Age • Information rights and obligations: what information rights individuals and  organizations possess • Property rights and obligations: how will traditional intellectual property rights be  protected in digital society • Accountability and control: who will be held accountable/liable for harm done to  individual and collective information • System quality: standards of data and system quality • Quality of life: what values should be preserved, what cultural practices are  supported Key Technology Trends That Raise Ethical Issues • IT has: o Heightened ethical concerns o Taxed existing social arrangements o Made laws obsolete • Four key technological trends responsible for ethical stresses: Trend Impact Computing power doubles  ­ More organizations depend on computer systems for  every 18 months critical operations ­ Standards for ensuring accuracy/reliability of info  systems not universally enforced/accepted Data storage costs rapidly  ­ Organizations can easily maintain detailed databases on  declining individuals ­ Has made routine violation of individual privacy cheap  and effective Data analysis advances Companies and government can find out highly detailed  personal info about individuals Networking advances ­ Copying data from one location to another  ­ Accessing personal data from remote locations • Profiling: use of computers to combine data from multiple sources and create  electronic summaries of info on individuals • Ex. DoubleClick tracks activities of visitors to create profile and sells to  companies to help them target Web ads better • Nonobvious relationship awareness (NORA):  o Takes info about people from different sources and correlates to find  hidden connections o Helps identify criminals or terrorists o Given government more powerful profiling capabilities Ethics in an Information Society Basic Concepts: Responsibility, Accountability, and Liability • Responsibility: person accepts potential costs, duties and obligations for the  decisions they make • Accountability:  o Means that mechanisms are in place to determine who took responsible  action, who is responsible o Feature of systems and social institutions • Liability: body of laws is in place that permits individuals to recover damages  done to them by other actors, systems organizations • Due process:  o Process in which laws are known and understood o Ability to appeal to higher authorities • Responsibility for consequences of technology falls on institutions, organizations  and managers who choose to use technology Candidate Ethical Principles 1. Golden Rule: do unto others as you would have them do unto you 2. Kant’s Categorical Imperative: if action is to right for everyone to take I, it is not  right for anyone 3. Decartes’ rule of change: if action cannot be taken repeatedly, it is not right to  take at all  4. Utilitarian Principle: take action that achieves higher or greater value 5. Risk Aversion Principle: take action that produces least harm or least potential  cost 6. Ethical “no free lunch” rule: assume that all tangible and intangible objects are  owned by someone else unless there is a specific declaration otherwise Professional Codes of Conduct • Canadian Medical Association (CMA) • Canadian Bar Association (CBA) • Canadian Information Processing Society (CIPS) • Association of Computing Machinery (ACM) • Take responsibility for partial regulation of professions • Determine entrance qualifications and competence The Moral Dimensions of Information Systems Information Rights: Privacy and Freedom in the Internet Age • Privacy: claim of individuals to be left alone, free from surveillance or  interference from other individuals/organizations • IT make invasion of privacy cheap, profitable, and effective • PIPEDA (Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act)  establishes following principles: o Accountability o Limiting collection o Limiting use o Disclosure and retention o Ensuring accuracy o Providing adequate security o Making info management policies available • Internet Challenges Privacy: o Possible to record what searches have been conducted, what pages have  been visited, online content a person has accessed, what items a person has  purchased over Web o Help businesses determine who is visiting sites and how to target offerings  • Cookies:  o Small text files deposited on a computer hard drive when user visits web  sites  o Tracks when a person visits a particular site o Can customize content on site to each visitor’s interests • Web beacons:  o Tiny objects invisibly embedded in email messages and web pages o Designed to monitor behavior of user visiting a site o Transmits IP address of computer, time page was viewed, how long, type  of browser • Spyware: secretly installs itself on computer • • Technical Solutions: o New technologies are available to protect user privacy during interactions  with Web sites o P3P (Platform Privacy Preferences): provides a standard for  communicating a Web site’s privacy policies to Internet users o Users can select level of privacy they wish to maintain o Ex. can adjust computer to screen out all cookies or let in selected cookies  o Problems: only small percentage of sites use P3P, most users do not  understand browser’s privacy settings, no enforcement of P3P standards Property Rights: Intellectual Property • Intellectual property: intangible property created by individuals/corporations • IT make it hard to protect intellectual property because computerized info can be  easily copied/distributed • Trade Secrets: o Any intellectual work product used for a business purpose (ex. formula,  device, pattern) o Whoever “has received info in confidence shall not take unfair advantage  of it” o Test for whether there has been a breach in confidence: 1. Info conveyed must be confidential (not public knowledge) 2. Info must have been communicated in confidence 3. Info must have been misused by party to whom it was communicated o Trade secret law is a matter of provincial jurisdiction o Creator must bind employees/customers with nondisclosure agreements  and prevent secret from escaping to public • Copyright: o Statutory grant that protects creators of intellectual property from having  work copied by others for at least 50 years o The Copyright Office registers copyrights and enforces law in Canada o Can be extended to books, periodicals, lectures, dramas, musical  compositions, maps, drawings, artwork, motion pictures o Purpose is to encourage creativity and authorship o Computer software is protected as literary work (protected for 50 years  after author of software dies) o Issue: underlying ideas behind work are not protected only their  manifestation in a work • Patents: o Grants owner exclusive monopoly on ideas behind an invention for 17­20  years o Granting of a patent is determined by Patent Office o Canadian Patent Office does not accept applications for software patents  because fall under copyright law o Key concepts in patent law are originality, novelty and invention • Challenges to Intellectual Property Rights o Info technologies create ethical, social and political issues o Make theft and replication easy o Info can be more widely produced and distributed o Ex. sharing of MP3 music files over internet  o Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) has made it illegal to bypass  technology­based protections of copyrighted materials Accountability, Liability, and Control • Have been some computer­ related liability problems • Ex. customers of TD bank could not access bank account balances because of a  glitch • Question is: Who is responsible? • Difficult to hold software producer liable for software products that are  considered to be like books • Print publishers, books, periodicals have not been held liable • Liability law will probably be extended to include software when software  provides an information service (ex. ATMs) System Quality: Data Quality and System Errors • What is an acceptable, technologically feasible level of system quality? • Software companies knowingly ship products with bugs in them because  time/cost of fixing all minor errors would prevent products from ever being  released • Three principal sources of poor system performance: (1) Software bugs and errors (2) Hardware/facility failures caused by natural causes (3) Poor input data quality • There is a barrier to perfect software • Users must be aware of potential for failure • Most common source of business system failure is data quality Quality of Life: Equity, Access, and Boundaries • Rapidity of Change: Reduced Response Time to Competition o Have helped create efficient national and international markets o Businesses have less time to adjust to competition o Time­based competition • Maintaining Boundaries: Family, Work, and Leisure o People can do anything anywhere any time o More people are working when they would have traditionally been with  family/friends o Extensive internet use for work or recreation takes time away from family  and friends • Dependence and Vulnerability
More Less

Related notes for COMMERCE 2KA3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit