Textbook Notes (369,074)
Canada (162,369)
Commerce (1,696)
Chapter 10&11

Info Systems - Chapter 10&11.docx

11 Pages
176 Views

Department
Commerce
Course Code
COMMERCE 2KA3
Professor
A L I R M O N T A Z E M I

This preview shows pages 1,2 and half of page 3. Sign up to view the full 11 pages of the document.
Description
CHAPTER TEN: E­COMMERCE – DIGITAL MARKETS AND  DIGITAL GOODS E­Commerce and the Internet E­Commerce Today • Ecommerce: use of internet and web to transact business • Commercial transactions involve exchange of value across  organizational/individual boundaries in return for products/services • Ecommerce was the only stable segment of retail during recession • By 2006 ecommerce revenues retuned to solid growth • Fastest­growing form of retail trade in North America, Europe, Asia Why E­Commerce is Different E­Commerce Technology  Business Significance Dimension Ubiquity: available anywhere at  ­ Marketplace is extended beyond traditional  all times (work, home, mobile) boundaries and removed from a geographic location ­ Transaction costs are reduced (do not need to  spend time/money on travelling) Global Reach: reaches across  ­ Potential market is the size of the world’s online  national boundaries  population Universal Standards: technical  ­ Disparate computer systems can easily  standards for conducting e­ communicate with each other commerce are universal ­ Lower market entry costs for merchants ­ Lower search costs for consumers Richness: video, audio, text  ­ Information richness: the complexity,  messages are possible personalization and content of a message ­ Web makes it possible to deliver rich messages to  a large number of people Interactivity: technology works  ­ Allow for two­way communication between  through interaction with the user merchant and consumer ­ Consumers are engaged in dialogue that adjusts  the experience to the individual Information Density: reduces  ­ Price transparency: ease with which consumers  information costs and raises  can find out the variety of prices in a market quality ­ Cost transparency: ability of consumers to  discover the actual costs merchants pa for products ­ Price discrimination: selling same goods to  different groups at different prices Personalization/Customization:  ­ Personalization: merchants can target marketing  allows personal messages to be  messages to specific individuals delivered to individuals as well as  ­ Customization: changing delivered products based  groups on user’s preference Social Technology: user content  ­ Users can create and share text, videos, music,  generation and social networking photos with personal friends Key Concepts in E­Commerce: Digital Markets and Digital Goods in a Global  Marketplace • Internet reduces information asymmetry • Information asymmetry: exists when one party in a transaction has more info than  the other party • Digital markets are more transparent than traditional markets • Ex. customers can look around at competing prices before buying a car • Digital markets: o Reduce menu costs (merchant’s cost of changing prices) o Reduce transaction costs o Raise price discrimination • Dynamic pricing: price of a product varies depending on demand characteristics  of customer/supply situation of seller • Disintermediation: removal of organizations/business process layers responsible  for intermediary steps in a value chain • Digital Goods: o Goods that can be delivered over a digital network o Ex. music, video, movies, TV, software, newspapers, magazines, books o Marginal cost of producing another unit is almost zero o Businesses dependent on physical products for sale are losing business to  the internet E­Commerce: Business and Technology Types of E­Commerce • Business­to­consumer (B2C) electronic commerce: retailing products/services to  individual shoppers (ex. Chapters.Indigo.ca) • Business­to­business (B2B) electronic commerce: sales of goods/services among  businesses • Consumer­to­consumer (C2C) electronic commerce: consumers selling directly to  consumer (ex. eBay, Kijiji, Craigslist) • Mobile commerce (m­commerce): the use of handheld wireless devices for  purchasing goods/services from any location E­Commerce Business Models Portal ­ Offer web search tools, news, email, IM, maps, calendars ­ Ex. Google, Bing, Yahoo!, MSN, AOL ­ Generate revenue by attracting large audiences, charging  advertisers for ad placement, charging for premium services E­tailer ­ Sells physical products directly to consumers or to individual  businesses ­ Ex. Amazon.ca, RedEnvelope.com Content Provider ­ Creates revenue by proving digital content (news, music,  photos, video) ­ Content might be generated by selling ad space or making  customer pay to access site ­ Ex. GlobeandMail.com, iTunes.ca, Canada.com Transaction Broker ­ Saves users money and time by processing online sales  transactions ­ Generates a fee every time transaction occurs ­ Ex. BaySteet.ca, Expedia.ca Market Creator ­ Provides digital environment where buyers and sellers can  meet, search for products, display products, establish prices for  products ­ Ex. eBay.ca, Priceline.com Service Provider ­ Web 2.0 application (photo sharing, video sharing, user­ generated content) ­ Provides online storage/backup ­ Ex. Google Apps, Flickr.com Community Provider ­ Online meeting place where people with similar interests can  communicate and find info ­ Ex. Facebook, Twitter E­Commerce Revenue Models • Revenue model: describes how firm will earn revenue, generate profits, produce  superior return on investment • Advertising Revenue Model: o Web site generates revenue by attracting large audience of visitors who  can be exposed to advertisements o Everything on the web is free to visitors because advertisers pay  production/distribution costs o Web sites with higher viewership are able to charge higher advertising  rates • Sales Revenue Model: o Companies derive revenue by selling goods, info, services to customers o Ex. Amazon, TheBay.com, iTunes o Micropayment systems: provide content providers with a cost­effective  method for processing high volumes of very small monetary transactions  (ex. buying one song off iTunes) • Subscription Revenue Model: o Web site offers content/services and charges subscription fee for access o Ex. Netflix, Wall Street Journal, eHarmony  • Free/Freemium Revenue Model:  o Offers basic services for free while charging premium for  advanced/special features o Want to attract large audience with free services and convert some to pay  subscription • Transaction Fee Revenue Model: o Company receives fee fr allowing a transaction o Ex. eBay provides online auction marketplace and receives small  transaction fee from seller • Affiliate Revenue Model: Web sites send visitors to other sites in return for  referral fee/percentage of revenue Web 2.0: Social Networking and the Wisdom of Crowds • Most popular Web 2.0 service is social networking (Facebook, LinkedIn) • Link people through mutual business or personal connections • Offer new possibilities for e­commerce • Can sell banner, video ant text ads • Social shopping sites let user swap shopping ideas with friends (ex. Kaboodle,  ThisNext, Wishabi.ca) • Wisdom of Crowds: o Large numbers of people can make better decisions about wide range of  topics/products than a single person o Business firms want to create sites where millions of people can interact o Crowdsourcing ex: Netflix offered $1 million to person who came up with  method for improving Netflix’s prediction of what movies customers  would like o Prediction markets: peer­to­peer betting markets where participants make  bets on specific outcomes of sales (ex. Betfair) E­Commerce Marketing • Internet provides marketers with new ways of identifying and communicating  with millions of customers at lower costs • Behavaioural targeting: tracking the history of clicking behavior of individuals on  thousands of web sites to understand interests and expose to ads suited to their  b▯ havior • Can be more efficient and lead to higher sales • Invades customer’s personal privacy • Web sites record: o Site users visited before coming to web site o Where they go when leave site o Type of operating system they use o Pages viewed on particular site o Time spent on each page o What was purchased • Use personalization technology to modify web pages presented to each user (kind  of like using individual salespeople)  • Advertising networks: o Create network of several thousand of most popular web sites o Track behavior or users across entire network o Build profiles of each user o Sell profiles to advertisers • Behaviorally targeted ads are 10x more likely to produce a consumer response  than a randomly chosen banner ad B2B E­Commerce: New Efficiencies and Relationships • B2B requires significant human intervention • Challenge of B2B: changing existing patterns and systems of procurement and  designing new Internet­based B2B solutions • Electronic data interchange (EDI):  o Allows computer­to­computer exchange between two organizations o Invoices, bills, shipment schedules, purchase orders o Eliminates printing and handling of paper at one end and inputting data at  other end • EDI can be used for continuous replenishment (suppliers have access to  purchasing firm’s production and delivery schedules) • Procurement: purchasing goods/materials as well as sourcing, negotiating, paying  for goods, making delivery arrangements • Private industrial networks (private exchange): large firm using an extranet to link  to its suppliers and other key business partners • Net marketplaces:  o Provide a single, digital marketplace based on internet technology for  many different buyers/sellers o Generate revenue from purchase/sale transactions services provided to  clients o Establish prices through negotiations, auctions, requests for quotes • Exchanges: o Independently owned third­party net marketplaces o Connect thousands of suppliers and buyers for spot purchasing o Provide vertical markets for a single industry o Fail because drive down prices and do not offer long­term relationships  with buyers The Mobile Digital Platform and Mobile E­Commerce M­Commerce Services and Applications • M­commerce applications have taken off for services that: o Are time critical o Appeal to people on the move o Accomplish task more efficiently  • Location­Based Services: o Global positioning system (GPS) o Wikitude.me: can identify precise location and where the phone is pointed  (ex. users can point smartphone camera toward mountains and see their  names and heights) o Loopt: can share status and track location of friends (posts ads based on  user location) • Banking and Financial Services: let customers manage accounts from mobile  devices (ex. RBC, Scotiabank) • Wireless Advertising and Retailing:  o Ads embedded in games, videos, applications o Shopkick: mobile applications that allows retailers to offer coupons to  people when they walk into stores o 30% of retailers have m­commerce web sites that make it possible for  shoppers to use cell phones to place orders Building an E­Commerce Web Site • Two most important management challe
More Less
Unlock Document

Only pages 1,2 and half of page 3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit