Textbook Notes (368,844)
Canada (162,200)
Commerce (1,696)
Chapter 14&15

Info Systems - Chapter 14&15.docx

7 Pages
256 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Commerce
Course
COMMERCE 2KA3
Professor
A L I R M O N T A Z E M I
Semester
Winter

Description
CHAPTER FOURTEEN: PROJECT MANAGEMENT, BUSINESS  VALUE, AND MANAGING CHANGE The Importance of Project Management • If info system does not meet expectations or costs too much to develop: o Company may not realize any benefits o System may not be able to solve problems for which it was intended • The way a project is executed is most important for influencing its outcome Runaway Projects and System Failure • Private­sector projects are underestimated by one half in terms of budget and time  required to deliver complete system promised • Systems development project without proper management will suffer  consequences: o Costs that exceed budgets o Unexpected time slippage o Technical performance that is less than expected o Failure to obtain anticipated benefits • User interface: part of the system with which end users interact • Users will be discouraged from using websites if: o Web pages are cluttered/poorly arranged o Users cannot easily find info they are seeking o It takes too long to access/display page on user’s computer Project Management Objectives • Project: planned series of related activities for achieving a specific business  objective • Project management: application of knowledge, skills, tools, techniques to  achieve specific targets within specified budget and time constraints • Project management activities: o Planning work o Assessing risk o Estimating resources required o Acquiring human and material resources o Assigning tasks o Controlling project execution o Reporting progress o Analyzing results • Scope: what work is or is not included in project • PM must ensure that scope of project does not expand beyond what was originally  intended • Time: time required to complete the project  • PM establishes: o Amount of time required to complete major components of project o Schedule for completing the work • Cost: time to complete a project multiplied by cost of human resources • PM develops budget for project and monitors ongoing project expenses • Quality: indicator of how well end result of a project satisfies objectives • Risk refers to problems that might threaten achievement of a project’s objectives  by: o Increasing time or cost o Lowering quality of project outputs o Halting the project Selecting Projects Management Structure for Information Systems Projects • Corporate strategic planning group: responsible for developing firm’s strategic  plan • Information systems steering committee: senior management group with  responsibility for systems development and operation • Project teams are supervised by project management group Critical Success Factors • Organization’s information requirements are determined by small number of  critical success factors (CSFs) of managers • If goals can be attained success of firm is assured • CSFs are shaped by: industry, firm, manager, broader environment • Systems are developed to deliver information on these CSFs • Interview top managers to identify goals and resulting CSFs to meet goals Portfolio Analysis • Portfolio analysis:  o Used to evaluate alternative system projects o Inventories all of organization’s info systems projects and assets  o Investments have certain profile of risk and benefit to firm • Firms try to improve return on portfolios of IT assets by balancing risk and return Scoring Models • Scoring model:  o Useful for selecting projects in which many criteria must be considered o Assigns weights to features of a system and calculates weighted totals Establishing the Business Value of Information Systems Information System Costs and Benefits • Tangible benefits: can be quantified and assigned a monetary value • Intangible benefits: cannot be immediately quantified but may lead to quantifiable  gains in long run (ex. more efficient customer service) • Capital Budgeting for Information Systems: o Must do financial analysis even if benefits of project outweigh costs o Capital budgeting models are techniques to measure value of investing in  long­term capital investment projects o Rely on measures of cash flows into and out of firm Real Options Pricing Model • For uncertain projects • Real options pricing models (ROPMs): use options valuation borrowed from  financial industry • Option: right to act at some future date • ROPMs give managers flexibility to stage IT investment or test waters with small  pilot projects Limitations of Financial Models • Overlook social and organizational dimensions of info systems • Do not consider: o Cost to end users o Impact that learning curves have on productivity o Time managers need to spend overseeing new system­related changes Managing Project Risk Dimensions of Project Risk • Project size: o Larger the project  ▯greater the risk o Projects are complex and difficult to control o Few reliable techniques for estimating time/cost to develop large­scale  info systems • Project structure: highly structured project  ▯low risk • Experience with technology: if project team and information system staff lack  required technical expertise  ▯project risk rises Change Management and the Concept of Implementation • Changes in way information is defined, accessed, used often lead to: o New distributions of authority and power o Changes in way work is done o Resistance and opposition • The Concept of Implementation: o All organizational activities working toward adoption, management,  routinization of an innovation o Systems analyst is a change agent o Analyst is responsible for ensuring that all parties involved accept changes  created by new system • The Role of End Users: o If users are involved they have more opportunities to control the outcome o More likely to react positively to completed system o Incorporating user knowledge/expertise leads to better solutions o User­designer communications gap: users and information systems  specialists have different backgrounds, interests, priorities o Systems development projects run high risk of failure when gap is large Controlling Risk Factors • Managing Technical Complexity: o Complex projects benefit from use of internal integration tools o Success of complex projects depend on how well technical complexity can  be managed o Project leaders must be able to anticipate problems and develop good  working relationships among the technical team o
More Less

Related notes for COMMERCE 2KA3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit