Textbook Notes (368,449)
Canada (161,886)
Economics (747)
ECON 1BB3 (338)
Chapter 5

Chapter 5 Econ 1BB3.docx

5 Pages
102 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Economics
Course
ECON 1BB3
Professor
Bridget O' Shaughnessy
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 5: Measuring a Nation’s Income  Microeconomics: the study of how households and firms make decisions and how they interact in markets  Macroeconomics: the study of economy­wide phenomena, including inflation, unemployment, and  economic growth  The Economy’s Income and Expenditure  • Gross Domestic Product (GDP) measures two things:  1. The total income of everyone in the economy  2. The total expenditure on the economy’s output of goods and services  • For an economy as a whole, Income = Expenditure because… o Every transaction has two parties: a buyer and a seller   ▯Every dollar spent by a buyer is a dollar of income for some seller  o Circular Flow Diagram   ▯Can compute GDP by either adding up the total expenditure by households OR adding  up the total income  The Measurement of Gross Domestic Product  GDP: the market value of all final goods and services produced within a country in a given period of time  GDP adds together many different kinds of products into a single measure of the value of economic activity  by using market prices INCLUDES:  • All items produced in the economy and sold legally in markets  • The market value of the housing services provided by the economy’s stock of housing   ▯Rent = tenant’s expenditure & landlord’s income   ▯Own = estimates rental value… assumes that the owner pays rent to himself, so the rent is  included both in his expenditure and in his income  • Final goods (card) • Intermediate goods (paper) when they are added to a firm’s inventory instead of being used  • Tangible goods (food, clothing, cars)  • Intangible goods (haircuts, housecleaning, dentists visits)  1 • Goods and services currently produced  EXCLUDES: **Exclusions sometimes lead to paradoxical results • Most items produced and sold illicitly (illegal drugs)  • Most items that are produced and consumed at home and never enter the marketplace (home  grown vegetables)  • Intermediate goods (paper) • Transactions involving items produced in the past (used cars)  WHERE not WHO  GDP measures the value of production that takes place within a specific interval of time (usually a year or a  quarter). GDP for a quarter:  ▯“At an annual rate”   ▯Amount of income and expenditure during the quarter x 4   ▯Seasonal adjustment: government statisticians adjust the quarterly data to take out the seasonal cycle  Other Measures of Income  1. Gross National Product (GNP)  ▯Total income earned by a nation’s permanent residents (nationals) regardless of where they were  located when the income was earned  2. Net National Product (NNP)   ▯Total income of a nation’s residents (GNP) minus losses from depreciation   ▯Depreciation: the wear and tear on the economy’s stock of equipment and structures  ▯Called the “capital consumption allowance”  3. National Income   ▯Total income earned by a nation’s residents in the production of goods & services   ▯Differs from NNP because excludes indirect business taxes (sales tax) & includes business  subsidies; also because of a “statistical discrepancy” that arises from problems in data collection  4. Personal Income   ▯Income that households and noncorporate businesses receive   ▯Excludes retained earnings (income that corporations have earned but have not paid out to their  owners)   ▯Subtracts corporate income taxes and contributions for social insurance (mostly Employment  Insurance taxes)   ▯Includes the interest income that households receive form their holdings of government debt and  the income that households receive from government transfer programs, ex. welfare, Canada  Pension Plan, Employment Insurance benefits  5. Disposable Personal Income   ▯Income that households and noncorporate businesses have left after satisfying all their  obligations to the government   ▯= personal income – personal taxes & certain nontax payments ( ex. traffic tickets)  2 The Components of GDP  Identity – an equation that must be try by the way the variables in the equation are defined  Y = C + I + G + NX  Consumption (C): • Spending by households on goods (durable & nondurable) and services (intangible and  postsecondary education), with the exception of purchases of new housing  Investment (I):  • Spending on capital equipment, inventories, and structures, including household purchases of new  housing  Government Purchases (G): • Spending on goods and services by local, territorial, provincial, and federal governments  • Includes the salaries of governm
More Less

Related notes for ECON 1BB3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit