Textbook Notes (368,122)
Canada (161,660)
Chapter 2

2D03_Chapter2.docx

5 Pages
102 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Life Sciences
Course
LIFESCI 2D03
Professor
Rashid Khan
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 2: Evolution and the Study of Animal Behaviour 2.1 Evolution by Natural Selection Favors Behavioural Adaptations  That Enhance Fitness 1. Over many generations, human breeders have selected individuals that possess  certain traits for a particular breed, called the breed standard. Many breeds were  created for specific tasks: terriers to hunt vermin, retrievers to find and retrieve  hunters’ birds, and greyhounds to hunt swift prey. 2. Differences in breed standards over time eventually led to ever­greater differences  among the dog breeds we see today. This process is known as artificial selection  because it is done “artificially”— by humans. 3. Natural selection is the differential reproduction and survivorship among  individuals within a population. It is the mechanism that results in adaptive  evolution. 4. Darwin was not the first to suggest that species evolve, but he (along with Alfred  Russell Wallace) was the first to describe the plausible mechanism, natural  selection, by which evolution can occur. 5. Natural selection occurs because there is variation in traits among individuals in  a population, and some traits provide individuals with greater reproductive  success. 1. When these traits are heritable, they are passed from parents to off spring.  Natural selection can result in changes in allele frequencies in a population  over time—a process that we recognize as evolution. 6. In his book On the Origin of Species (1859), Darwin articulated three conditions  required for evolution by natural selection: 1. Variation exists among individuals in a population in the traits they possess. 2. Individuals’ different traits are, at least in part, heritable. Traits can be passed  from parents to their off spring so that off spring resemble their parents in the  traits they possess. 3. Traits confer differences in survivorship and reproduction, a measure we call  fitness: individuals with certain traits will have higher fitness, while those  with other traits will have lower fitness relative to one another. Therefore, the  fitness of individuals is not random; it is based on the traits they possess. 7. Many behavioral traits that have been studied are in fact heritable, including  mating behavior, feeding behavior, overall activity level, and aggression (Stirling,  Réale, & Roff 2002). MEASURE OF HERITABILITY 8. Parent­off spring regression analysis examines the similarity between parents  and their offspring in terms of the traits they possess. If a trait has a genetic  basis, then the trait values of off spring should be similar to the trait values of  their parents: there should be a positive relationship between off spring and  parent trait values. In this method, off spring trait values are plotted against  parent trait values, and the slope of the resulting regression indicates the  heritability of the trait. 9. In the selection experiment method, different groups of individuals are subjected  to differential selection on the trait in question. If artificial selection acting on a  trait results in changes in that trait value in subsequent generations, then the trait  has a genetic basis. GREAT TIT EXPLORATORY BEHAVIOUR 10. Niels Dingemanse and his colleagues examined the heritability of exploratory  behavior in free­living great tits ( Parus major ) (Dingemanse et al. 2002). 11. Previous work indicated that individuals exhibit differences in their exploratory  behavior when placed in novel environments: some actively explore their new  environment quickly (bold individuals), while others are more reticent and slower  to explore (shy individuals) (Verbeek, Drent, & Wiepkema 1994; Drent &  Marchetti 1999). 1. There was a significant positive correlation between a mother’s exploratory  score and that of her off spring, demonstrating a genetic basis for differences  among individuals in this behavior. 12. The research team found strong changes in exploratory behavior of the two lines  in the selection experiment over four generations. By the fourth generation, the  average exploratory score for individuals in the high line was over four times  higher than that for individuals in the slow line (Drent, van Oers, & van  Noordwijk 2003) (Figure 2.3). 1. This result indicates that exploratory behavior is heritable. Together, the  results of these two experiments conclusively demonstrate that exploratory  behavior in great tits has a genetic component.  2. This conclusion was based on two pieces of evidence:  1. Offspring resemble their parents in this behavior, and 2. Artificial selection on exploratory behavior produced significant  differences in the two artificially selected lines. VARIATION WITHIN A POPULATION 13. Each generation introduces new genetic variation into populations through gene  recombination, the immigration of new alleles into a population, and mutations  (Hartl 2000). 1. Changes in environmental conditions can change the fitness of different traits  and so maintain much variation in the frequencies of different alleles. 14. Many behaviors develop as a consequence of both genetic and environmental  effects. Thus, even close relatives (with similar genes) oft en exhibit very different  behavior as adults when they are exposed to different environmental conditions as  juveniles. 15. Many complex behaviors require learning and so are modified with experience.  Because individuals will differ in experience over the course of a lifetime, we will  observe differences in their behavior as well. 16. There might be little or no variation in fitness over a wide range of behaviors.  One example is dispersal behavior. Dispersal is the process of moving away from  the natal area, or place of birth, to find an adult breeding area or territory. 17. The fitness of a trait (behavior) may be related to its frequency in a population.  When rare, the behavior may yield high fitness, but when common, it may result  in much lower fitness. 18. Individuals in all populations typically differ in size, nutritional status, health,  and other traits. These differences can lead to significant variation in behaviors. 
More Less

Related notes for LIFESCI 2D03

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit