Textbook Notes (368,317)
Canada (161,798)
Psychology (1,468)
PSYCH 1XX3 (384)
Joe Kim (357)
Chapter 3

Chapter 3, part 2.docx

5 Pages
102 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 1XX3
Professor
Joe Kim
Semester
Winter

Description
1XX3 Textbook Notes Neuroscience Part 2 The Anatomy of the Nervous System Terminology Neuraxis: the line drawn along the spinal cord and through to the front of the brain Rostral: towards the head (front of this line) Caudal: towards the tail (back end) Dorsal: The top and back of the head (structures above neuraxis) Ventral: surface faces the ground Medial: Structures closer to the centre of the brain Lateral: Structures further from the centre Studying the Brain Franz Joseph Gall’s theory of phrenology: pioneered the idea that different brain functions were  located in different areas • Different mental attributes like “benevolence”, “hope” or “intelligence” were located in  different sub­organs of the brain and these areas would grow with the use of that facility • Theory discredited, BUT▯used to develop the idea of the localization of function in  certain brain areas Lesion Studies • If a certain area od the brain is damaged or removed, and a certain function of the brain is  lost (such as memory or vision), the structure can be associated with that brain function • Done on animals • Pierre Florens: o Cerebellum: motor coordination o Medulla: heartbeat and respiration • Removing part of the brain: ablation • Frontal lobes: planning and impulse control • Phineas Gage▯changed personality after accident Electrical Stimulation and Single Cell Recording • Stimulating a part of the brain and trying to determine what function is elicited Wilder Penfield: • Performed brain surgery on epileptic patients in order to surgically remove epileptic  activity from the brain—and althrough removing any brain tissue could potentially lead  to future impariement, he was anxious to avoid cutting into the eloquent area of the brain —eloquent cortex (paralysis, loss of language ability, or loss of sensory processing) In animals: you can record brain activity with microelectrodes Intracellular Recordings: inserted through the cell membrane  • The responses obtained by the recordings of these electrodes are known as single­unit  recordings • Groups of larger electrodes may also be inserted into the brain tissue of an awake,  behaving animal in order to obtain extracellular recordings • Array of electrodes then processed by computer in order to separate the individual action  potentials from any cell bodies that are near the electrode tips activity from several cells  can be simultaneously recorded with this technique • Place cells discovered as a result of this—rats—it was hypothesized from this that a  cognitive map of the environment is located in the hippocampus of the rat Structural Neuroimaging • Clinical lesion studies often rely on an autopsy of the patient to determine the nature of  the brain damage • However, other methods include: X­RAY CT: • Patient’s head is placed in a ring containing an e­ray emitter and detector on opposite  sides of the patient’s head to the detector • The ring rotates while the emitter passes x­rays through the patient’s head to the detector • The detector’s response is recorded from all angles through the patient’s head, and a  computer is used to reconstruct an image of the brain • CT scans subject individuals to a moderate to high dosage of radiation and thus pose a  level of cancer risk MRI • Uses a strong magnetic field to image the brain—process known as magnetic resonance  imaging  • When tissue is placed inside of a strong magnetic field and is excited by a radio  frequency pulse, the molecules in the body will vibrate at a certain rate—emitting their  own radio frequency waves • Antenna called a head coil picks up these radio waves and records them for computer  analysis • Different molecules will produce slightly different radio waves, and the computer will  decode this information producing exquisitely detailed pictures of different slices of the  brain • The MRI can distinguish between different tissue types Functional Neuroimaging  • Non­invasive procedures to study the brain Positron Emission Tomography (PET) • Person is injected with a mildly radioactive form of glucose (radionuclide) o If we could measure which areas are consuming more then we are able to identify  which areas are active Disadvantages 1) The production of radionuclides is very expensive 2) The radionuclide must be injected to an artery (not completely non­invasive) 3)  The person being scanned is exposed to a small dose of radiation posing a minimal  cancer risk The Functional MRI or FMRI • oxygen is another requirement of a highly active neuron carried into the blood supply  from the lungs • when an area of the brain is
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 1XX3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit